Commit 72fa964f authored by Paul Eggert's avatar Paul Eggert
Browse files

Hyphen and dash fixes.

parent 200969d8
......@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ HAVE_ALLOCA.
The user can @code{#include <alloca.h>} on all platforms, and use
@code{alloca} on those platforms where the preprocessor macro HAVE_ALLOCA
evaluates to true. If HAVE_ALLOCA is false, the code should use a heap-based
memory allocation based on @code{malloc} or - in C++ - @code{new}. Note that
memory allocation based on @code{malloc} or (in C++) @code{new}. Note that
the @code{#include <alloca.h>} must be the first one after the
autoconf-generated @file{config.h}, for AIX 3 compatibility. Thanks to IBM for
this nice restriction!
......
......@@ -35,8 +35,8 @@ WORD_T GCD (WORD_T a, WORD_T b);
If you need the least common multiple of two numbers, it can be computed
like this: @code{lcm(a,b) = (a / gcd(a,b)) * b} or
@code{lcm(a,b) = a * (b / gcd(a,b))}.
Avoid the formula @code{lcm(a,b) = (a * b) / gcd(a,b)} because - although
mathematically correct - it can yield a wrong result, due to integer overflow.
Avoid the formula @code{lcm(a,b) = (a * b) / gcd(a,b)} because---although
mathematically correct---it can yield a wrong result, due to integer overflow.
In some applications it is useful to have a function taking the gcd of two
signed numbers. In this case, the gcd function result is usually normalized
......
......@@ -60,8 +60,8 @@ access functions to the kernel's system calls, and little more.
There is no clear borderline between both areas.
For example, Gnulib has a facility for generating the name of backup
files. While this task is entirely at the application level --- no
standard specifies an API for it --- the na@"{@dotless{i}}ve code has
files. While this task is entirely at the application level---no
standard specifies an API for it---the na@"{@dotless{i}}ve code has
some portability problems because on some platforms the length of file
name components is limited to 30 characters or so. Gnulib handles
that.
......@@ -79,8 +79,8 @@ failed.
Gnulib supports a number of platforms that we call the ``reasonable
portability targets''. This class consists of widespread operating systems,
for three years after their last availability, or --- for proprietary
operating systems --- as long as the vendor provides commercial support for
for three years after their last availability, or---for proprietary
operating systems---as long as the vendor provides commercial support for
it. Already existing Gnulib code for older operating systems is usually
left in place for longer than these three years. So it comes that programs
that use Gnulib run pretty well also on these older operating systems.
......@@ -200,13 +200,13 @@ reside in the @file{lib/} subdirectory. Autoconf macro files reside in
the @file{m4/} subdirectory. Build scripts reside in the
@file{build-aux/} subdirectory.
The module description contains the list of files --- @code{gnulib-tool}
The module description contains the list of files; @code{gnulib-tool}
copies these files. It contains the module's
dependencies --- @code{gnulib-tool} installs them as well. It also
dependencies; @code{gnulib-tool} installs them as well. It also
contains the autoconf macro invocation (usually a single line or
nothing at all) --- @code{gnulib-tool} ensures this is invoked from the
nothing at all); @code{gnulib-tool} ensures this is invoked from the
package's @file{configure.ac} file. And also a @file{Makefile.am}
snippet --- @code{gnulib-tool} collects these into a @file{Makefile.am}
snippet; @code{gnulib-tool} collects these into a @file{Makefile.am}
for the tailored Gnulib part. The module description and include file
specification are for documentation purposes; they are combined into
@file{MODULES.html}.
......@@ -217,9 +217,9 @@ The module system serves two purposes:
@item
It ensures consistency of the used autoconf macros and @file{Makefile.am}
rules with the source code. For example, source code which uses the
@code{getopt_long} function --- this is a common way to implement parsing
of command line options in a way that complies with the GNU standards ---
needs the source code (@file{lib/getopt.c} and others), the autoconf macro
@code{getopt_long} function---this is a common way to implement parsing
of command line options in a way that complies with the GNU standards---needs
the source code (@file{lib/getopt.c} and others), the autoconf macro
which detects whether the system's libc already has this function (in
@file{m4/getopt.m4}), and a few @file{Makefile.am} lines that create the
substitute @file{getopt.h} if not. These three pieces belong together.
......@@ -294,17 +294,17 @@ header file the system's one is used.
@subsection Enhancements of ISO C or POSIX functions
These are sometimes POSIX functions with GNU extensions also found in
glibc --- examples: @samp{getopt}, @samp{fnmatch} --- and often new
APIs --- for example, for all functions that allocate memory in one way
glibc---examples: @samp{getopt}, @samp{fnmatch}---and often new
APIs---for example, for all functions that allocate memory in one way
or the other, we have variants which also include the error checking
against the out-of-memory condition.
@subsection Portable general use facilities
Examples are a module for copying a file --- the portability problems
Examples are a module for copying a file---the portability problems
relate to the copying of the file's modification time, access rights,
and extended attributes --- or a module for extracting the tail
component of a file name --- here the portability to native Windows
and extended attributes---or a module for extracting the tail
component of a file name---here the portability to native Windows
requires a different API than the classical POSIX @code{basename} function.
@subsection Reusable application code
......@@ -373,7 +373,7 @@ licenses apply to files in special directories:
Module description files are under this copyright:
@quotation
Copyright @copyright{} 200X-200Y Free Software Foundation, Inc.@*
Copyright @copyright{} 20XX--20YY Free Software Foundation, Inc.@*
Copying and distribution of this file, with or without modification,
in any medium, are permitted without royalty provided the copyright
notice and this notice are preserved.
......@@ -383,7 +383,7 @@ notice and this notice are preserved.
Autoconf macro files are under this copyright:
@quotation
Copyright @copyright{} 200X-200Y Free Software Foundation, Inc.@*
Copyright @copyright{} 20XX--20YY Free Software Foundation, Inc.@*
This file is free software; the Free Software Foundation
gives unlimited permission to copy and/or distribute it,
with or without modifications, as long as this notice is preserved.
......@@ -398,7 +398,7 @@ not a problem, since compiled tests are not installed by ``make install''.
Documentation files are under this copyright:
@quotation
Copyright @copyright{} 2004-200Y Free Software Foundation, Inc.@*
Copyright @copyright{} 2004--20YY Free Software Foundation, Inc.@*
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.3 or
any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no
......
......@@ -577,8 +577,8 @@ When you use these options, the functions in Gnulib are built
in such a way that they will always use this domain regardless of the
default domain set by @code{textdomain}.
In order to use this method, you must -- in each program that might use
Gnulib code -- add an extra line to the part of the program that
In order to use this method, you must---in each program that might use
Gnulib code---add an extra line to the part of the program that
initializes locale-dependent behavior. Where you would normally write
something like:
......@@ -780,7 +780,7 @@ where the system's @code{timegm} function is missing or buggy, a replacement
that is based on a function @code{mktime_internal}. The module
@code{mktime-internal} that provides this function provides it on all
platforms. So, by default, the file @file{mktime-internal.c} will be
compiled on all platforms --- even on glibc and BSD systems which have a
compiled on all platforms, even on glibc and BSD systems which have a
working @code{timegm} function. When the option
@samp{--conditional-dependencies} is given, on the other hand, and if
@code{mktime-internal} was not explicitly required on the command line,
......
......@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@ This manual is for GNU Gnulib (updated @value{UPDATED}),
which is a library of common routines intended to be shared at the
source level.
Copyright @copyright{} 2004-2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
Copyright @copyright{} 2004--2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.3 or
......@@ -164,7 +164,7 @@ Every API (C functions or variables) provided should be declared in a header
file (.h file) and implemented in one or more implementation files (.c files).
The separation has the effect that users of your module need to read only
the contents of the .h file and the module description in order to understand
what the module is about and how to use it - not the entire implementation.
what the module is about and how to use it---not the entire implementation.
Furthermore, users of your module don't need to repeat the declarations of
the functions in their code, and are likely to receive notification through
compiler errors if you make incompatible changes to the API (like, adding a
......@@ -931,8 +931,8 @@ turned off in others. This can be useful if your package consists of
an application layer that does not need to invoke POSIX functions and
an operating system interface layer that contains all the OS function
calls. In such a situation, you will want to turn on the namespace mode
for the application layer --- to avoid many preprocessor macro
definitions --- and turn it off for the OS interface layer --- to avoid
for the application layer---to avoid many preprocessor macro
definitions---and turn it off for the OS interface layer---to avoid
the drawback of the namespace mode, mentioned above.
......
......@@ -8,9 +8,9 @@ Fortran library archive files.
The macros @code{AC_CHECK_LIB}, @code{AC_SEARCH_LIBS} from GNU Autoconf check
for the presence of certain C, C++, or Fortran library archive files.
The libraries are looked up in the default linker path -- a system dependent
list of directories, that usually contains the @file{/usr/lib} directory --
and those directories given by @code{-L} options in the @code{LDFLAGS}
The libraries are looked up in the default linker path---a system dependent
list of directories, that usually contains the @file{/usr/lib} directory---and
those directories given by @code{-L} options in the @code{LDFLAGS}
variable.
@unnumberedsubsec Locating Libraries
......
......@@ -31,14 +31,14 @@ misbehave badly after overflow occurs.
Many techniques have been proposed to attack these problems. These
include precondition testing, GCC's @option{-ftrapv} option, GCC's
no-undefined-overflow branch, the As-if Infinitely Ranged (AIR) model
no-undefined-overflow branch, the as-if infinitely ranged (AIR) model
implemented in Clang, saturation semantics where overflow reliably
yields an extreme value, the RICH static transformer to an
overflow-checking variant, and special testing methods. For more
information about these techniques, see: Dannenberg R, Dormann W,
Keaton D @emph{et al.},
@url{http://www.sei.cmu.edu/library/abstracts/reports/10tn008.cfm,
As-if Infinitely Ranged integer model -- 2nd ed.}, Software Engineering
As-if infinitely ranged integer model, 2nd ed.}, Software Engineering
Institute Technical Note CMU/SEI-2010-TN-008, April 2010.
Gnulib supports the precondition testing technique, as this is easy to
......
......@@ -93,10 +93,10 @@ was already supported in GCC 3.4, but without the command line option,
introduced in GCC 4.0, the third approach could not be used.)
More explanations on this subject can be found in
@url{http://gcc.gnu.org/wiki/Visibility} - which contains more details
on the GCC features and additional advice for C++ libraries - and in
Ulrich Drepper's paper @url{http://people.redhat.com/drepper/dsohowto.pdf}
- which also explains other tricks for reducing the startup time impact
@url{http://gcc.gnu.org/wiki/Visibility}, which contains more details
on the GCC features and additional advice for C++ libraries, and in
Ulrich Drepper's paper @url{http://people.redhat.com/drepper/dsohowto.pdf},
which also explains other tricks for reducing the startup time impact
of shared libraries.
The gnulib autoconf macro @code{gl_VISIBILITY} tests for GCC 4.0 or newer.
......
......@@ -38,7 +38,7 @@ demanded a knowledge of five different languages. It is no wonder then
that we often look into our own immediate past or future, last Tuesday
or a week from Sunday, with feelings of helpless confusion. @dots{}
--- Robert Grudin, @cite{Time and the Art of Living}.
---Robert Grudin, @cite{Time and the Art of Living}.
@end quotation
This section describes the textual date representations that @sc{gnu}
......
......@@ -13,7 +13,7 @@ Portability problems fixed by either Gnulib module @code{ceil} or @code{ceil-iee
Portability problems fixed by Gnulib module @code{ceil-ieee}:
@itemize
@item
This function returns a positive zero for an argument between -1 and 0
This function returns a positive zero for an argument between @minus{}1 and 0
on some platforms:
AIX 7.1, OSF/1 5.1.
@item
......
......@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ MSVC 9.
Portability problems fixed by Gnulib module @code{ceilf-ieee}:
@itemize
@item
This function returns a positive zero for an argument between -1 and 0
This function returns a positive zero for an argument between @minus{}1 and 0
on some platforms:
Mac OS X 10.5, AIX 7.1, OSF/1 5.1.
@item
......
......@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ MSVC 9.
Portability problems fixed by Gnulib module @code{ceill-ieee}:
@itemize
@item
This function returns a positive zero for an argument between -1 and 0
This function returns a positive zero for an argument between @minus{}1 and 0
on some platforms:
OSF/1 5.1.
@end itemize
......
......@@ -14,10 +14,10 @@ Some platforms fail to detect trailing slash on non-directories, as in
FreeBSD 7.2, AIX 7.1, Solaris 9.
@item
Some platforms fail to update the change time when at least one
argument was not -1, but no ownership changes resulted:
argument was not @minus{}1, but no ownership changes resulted:
OpenBSD 4.0.
@item
When passed an argument of -1, some implementations really set the owner
When passed an argument of @minus{}1, some implementations really set the owner
user/group id of the file to this value, rather than leaving that id of the
file alone.
@item
......
......@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ Portability problems fixed by Gnulib:
This function is missing on some platforms:
Minix 3.1.8, AIX 5.1, HP-UX 11, Solaris 9, mingw, MSVC 9.
@item
This function produces wrong results for arguments <= -17.32868 on some platforms:
This function produces wrong results for arguments <= @minus{}17.32868 on some platforms:
IRIX 6.5.
@end itemize
......
......@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@ This function was not correctly implemented in glibc versions before 2.2.
When @code{iconv} encounters an input character that is valid but that
cannot be converted to the output character set, glibc's and GNU libiconv's
@code{iconv} stop the conversion. Some other implementations put an
implementation-defined character into the output buffer. ---
implementation-defined character into the output buffer.
Gnulib provides higher-level facilities @code{striconv} and @code{striconveh}
(wrappers around @code{iconv}) that deal with conversion errors in a platform
independent way.
......
......@@ -40,7 +40,7 @@ when GNU libiconv is not installed.
@item
For some encodings A and B, this function cannot convert directly from A to B,
although an indirect conversion from A through UTF-8 to B is possible. This
occurs on some platforms: Solaris 11 2010-11. --- Gnulib provides a higher-level
occurs on some platforms: Solaris 11 2010-11. Gnulib provides a higher-level
facility @code{striconveh} (a wrapper around @code{iconv}) that deals with
this problem.
@item
......
......@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ Portability problems fixed by either Gnulib module @code{log1pf} or @code{log1pf
This function is missing on some platforms:
Minix 3.1.8, AIX 5.1, HP-UX 11, Solaris 9, MSVC 9.
@item
This function returns a wrong value for the argument -1.0f on some platforms:
This function returns a wrong value for the argument @code{-1.0f} on some platforms:
IRIX 6.5.
@end itemize
......
......@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@ In practice, regular files and block devices support seeking, and ttys, pipes,
and most character devices don't support it.
@item
When the third argument is invalid, POSIX says that @code{lseek} should set
@code{errno} to @code{EINVAL} and return -1, but in this situation a
@code{errno} to @code{EINVAL} and return @minus{}1, but in this situation a
@code{SIGSYS} signal is raised on some platforms:
IRIX 6.5.
@item
......
......@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@ This function does nothing and always returns 0 in programs that are not
linked with @code{-lpthread} on some platforms:
FreeBSD 6.4, HP-UX 11.31, Solaris 9.
@item
When it fails, this functions returns -1 instead of the error number on
When it fails, this functions returns @minus{}1 instead of the error number on
some platforms:
Cygwin 1.7.5.
@item
......
......@@ -37,5 +37,5 @@ Portability problems not fixed by Gnulib:
@item
This function does not allow to determine the required size of output buffer;
the use of a non-NULL @samp{resolved} buffer is non-portable, since
PATH_MAX --- if it is defined --- is nothing more than a guess.
PATH_MAX, if it is defined, is nothing more than a guess.
@end itemize
Markdown is supported
0% or .
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment