Commit fcc3a04d authored by Craig Maloney's avatar Craig Maloney
Browse files

Finishing adding Using Magic Section

parent cbf93dc5
......@@ -2355,53 +2355,46 @@ Camomile is working on a potion of rapid growth. She uses her Quick approach to
Potions created at Poor level or lower are unstable and unusable. Depending on the scene the GM may choose to have the potion do nothing, have the opposite effect, or become a potion of something unexpected. If the goal was for Camomile to create a potion of rapid growth and she creates a Poor potion then the potion may have no effect, have the opposite effect (it becomes a potion of rapid shrinking), or does something unexpected (it becomes a potion of itchiness, a potion of rapid hair growth, or something equally unpleasant.)
## Using potions
\mysection{Using potions}
Using a potion is the same as casting a spell. Use the effectiveness of the potion as the starting level for the spell and roll to find if the potion succeeds. On a successful roll the aspect from the potion is added to the character, object, or scene.
## Example of creating and using potions
Pepper is creating a Potion of Genius. She uses her Quick (Good) approach to create the potion. She doesn't add any other bonuses to her roll, and rolls a Mediocre result (+0), which doesn't add anything to her Quick (Good) approach. Her potion now has the aspect "Potion of Genius" at the level of Good. The GM determines that making a cat into a genius is Good difficulty. She rolls again and gets an Average (+1) result, which is more than the difficulty of Good. When she gives it to Carrot he takes the aspect "Temporary Genius" for the duration of the scene. If she were to attempting to make inanimate rock a temporary genius the GM may set the difficulty at Fantastic or higher (Making an inanimate rock a genius is difficult, even by Heveva standards), so even the Great level of the potion would have no effect.
\subsection{Example of creating and using potions}%
\label{sub:Example of creating and using potions}
Pepper is creating a Potion of Genius. She uses her Quick (Good) approach to create the potion. She doesn't add any other bonuses to her roll, and rolls a Mediocre result (+0), which doesn't add anything to her Quick (Good) approach. Her potion now has the aspect ``Potion of Genius'' at the level of Good. The GM determines that making a cat into a genius is Good difficulty. She rolls again and gets an Average (+1) result, which is more than the difficulty of Good. When she gives it to Carrot he takes the aspect ``Temporary Genius'' for the duration of the scene. If she were to attempting to make inanimate rock a temporary genius the GM may set the difficulty at Fantastic or higher (Making an inanimate rock a genius is difficult, even by Hereva standards), so even the Great level of the potion would have no effect.
## Optional rule: potions from other disciplines
\mysection{Optional rule: potions from other disciplines}
If you are creating a potion that is based off of the magic from one of the other schools you create at the same level as your ability with that school. Even if your Quick or Careful is higher than your skill with the other school's magic you still create potions and spells at your level of familiarity with that particular school's magic.
Example: If Shichimi is creating a growth potion that uses Hippiah magic, so her potion is created at Mediocre. Good thing Camomile didn't participate or the canary might have been much larger!
## Optional rule: quality of ingredients
\mysection{Optional rule: quality of ingredients}
Certain ingredients may be of better quality than others. If the GM wishes they may keep track of the quality of the ingredients (based on the Fate ladder, from Terrible to Good) for the potion. Add the ingredients together and use that for a potion creation bonus.
Shichimi is creating a potion for rapid growth (a Hippiah-based potion). Her rating in Hippiah spells is Mediocre (+0). She has sourced ingredients for the spell (Poor, Mediocre, Good, Good, Great). She adds them together to get +6, which is capped off at Good (+2). She then rolls and gets a Poor (-1) result. This means that her Potion of Growth has the aspect Potion of Growth and an effectiveness of Fair.
## Using potions
Potions are one-time use items. Once a potion is used you cross it off or remove the card from play.
## Optional Rule: Too many potions
Potion bottles are brittle things. They can leak, break, or slip out of one's hands at inopprtune times. If a player has more than three potions on their person at one time they may fumble them and cause them to break. The GM may require a test against a character's Careful Approach to ensure that one or more of the potion bottles doesn't break during a combat or other strenuous task. Breaking one potion bottle means that potion is now affecting the player who broke it. The GM determines which potion bottle broke and the potion's aspect now applies to the player character. For instance, if Pepper has three potions and manages to break one the GM selects from her list of potions. She is carrying two potions of invisibility and one potion for slowing down time. The GM decides that one of the potions of invisibility shattered while climbing a rock face, so now she's invisible against the rock face, which adds a level of difficulty to her rock climbing since she can't see her hands. She'd better be extra careful!
Be creative with the results of combining too many potions together. Combining a potion of resurrection with a potion of poshness and a potion of rapid growth could mean having a well-dressed canary stomping through Komona. Who knows what might have happened had Pepper brought an actual potion with her? Perhaps a potion of invisibility might have made an invisible resurrected giant posh canary, or it could have interacted badly with the other potions to make light-reflecting resurrected giant posh canary. Let your imagination and the imagination of the table be your guide.
\mysection{Optional Rule: Too many potions}
## Rea Exhaustion
Potion bottles are brittle things. They can leak, break, or slip out of one's hands at inopportune times. If a player has more than three potions on their person at one time they may fumble them and cause them to break. The GM may require a test against a character's Careful Approach to ensure that one or more of the potion bottles doesn't break during a combat or other strenuous task. Breaking one potion bottle means that potion is now affecting the player who broke it. The GM determines which potion bottle broke and the potion's aspect now applies to the player character. For instance, if Pepper has three potions and manages to break one the GM selects from her list of potions. She is carrying two potions of invisibility and one potion for slowing down time. The GM decides that one of the potions of invisibility shattered while climbing a rock face, so now she's invisible against the rock face, which adds a level of difficulty to her rock climbing since she can't see her hands. She'd better be extra careful!
If you run out of Fate Points while casting a spell or making a potion you may take the consequence Rea Exhaustion to gain a Fate Point. Rea Exhaustion is not something to be taken lightly. Rea Exhaustion affects your refresh level and adds an additional consequence to your character. Each level of Rea Exhaustion subtracts one from your current Refresh. If a character has three refresh and takes the moderate consequence of Rea Exhaustion their Refresh drops from 3 to 2. If they take a second consequence of Rea Exhaustion at the Severe level and their refresh drops from 2 to 1.
Be creative with the results of combining too many potions together. Combining a potion of resurrection with a Potion of Poshness and a Potion of Rapid Growth could mean having a well-dressed canary stomping through Komona. Who knows what might have happened had Pepper brought an actual potion with her? Perhaps a potion of invisibility might have made an invisible resurrected giant posh canary, or it could have interacted badly with the other potions to make light-reflecting resurrected giant posh canary. Let your imagination and the imagination of the table be your guide.
The GM awards one Fate Point for taking the Rea Exhaustion consequence. For parties that prefer a more challenging game the Fate Point may be taken from one of the other players. See the optional rule below.
\mysection{Rea Exhaustion}
Rea Exhaustion: If a witch runs out of Rea (fate points) for a spell you may take the consequence Rea Exhaustion. This grants one fate point for a moderate consequence or two fate points for a severe consequence. Remember that the rules for being Taken Out still apply.
If you run out of Fate Points while casting a spell or making a potion you may take the consequence Rea Exhaustion to gain a one-time Fate Point. Rea Exhaustion is not something to be taken lightly --- Rea Exhaustion affects your refresh level and adds an additional consequence to your character. Each level of Rea Exhaustion subtracts one from your current Refresh. If a character has three refresh and takes the moderate consequence of Rea Exhaustion their Refresh drops from 3 to 2. If they take a second consequence of Rea Exhaustion at the Severe level and their refresh drops from 2 to 1.
Until the Rea Exhaustion is removed then your refresh is depleted by one for moderate consequence or two for severe consequences.
In the standard rules the GM awards one Fate Point for taking the Rea Exhaustion consequence. A more challenging game may be had by using the optional Balance of Rea rule below.
The consequence Rea Exhaustion can only be removed via rest or meditation or concentrated study. Each period of deep rest, meditation, or study reduces the Rea Exhaustion consequence by one point.
The consequence Rea Exhaustion can only be removed via rest or meditation or concentrated study. Each period of deep rest, meditation, or study reduces the Rea Exhaustion consequence by one point. Any refresh points that were removed because of Rea Exhaustion are replenished.
## Optional Rule: The Balance of Rea
\mysection{Optional Rule: The Balance of Rea}
Groups that prefer a more challenging game or more consequences for Rea Exhaustion may opt to use The Balance of Rea rule in their game. The default Rea Exhaustion consequence gives one Fate Point for Rea Exhaustion. This Fate Point comes from the GM's pool of points. The Balance of Rea rule changes where that Fate Point comes from. When a player character takes the Rea Exhaustion consequence they may select another player character that is closest to the player character, or the player character with the most Fate Points. That player then gives the player taking Rea Exhaustion one of their Fate Points. If this reduces the giving player's character to zero Fate Points they must then take a moderate Rea Exhaustion consequence and receive a Fate Point from one of the other players that has Fate Points. If that player is then reduced to zero then the Fate Points are distributed and subsequent consequences are taken. If all players have the consequence Rea Exhaustion and the players have run out of Fate Points to give then the GM may compel the group to accept a world aspect that grants each player one Fate Point. This aspect should reflect a massive Rea Shift in the world of Hereva. At the end of the Great War each of the Chaosah Witches were exhausted of their Rea which caused the Great Tree of Komona to break, which damaged the magic in all of Hereva. GMs, the decision of how severe the exhaustion of Rea would be for your party of witches is up to you.
Groups that prefer a more challenging game and more consequences for Rea Exhaustion may opt to use The Balance of Rea rule in their game. The default Rea Exhaustion consequence gives one Fate Point for Rea Exhaustion. This Fate Point comes from the GM's pool of points. The Balance of Rea rule changes where that Fate Point comes from. When a player character takes the Rea Exhaustion consequence they may select another player character that is closest to the player character, or the player character with the most Fate Points. That player then gives the player taking Rea Exhaustion one of their Fate Points. If this reduces the giving player's character to zero Fate Points they must then take a moderate Rea Exhaustion consequence and receive a Fate Point from one of the other players that has Fate Points. If that player is then reduced to zero then the Fate Points are distributed and subsequent consequences are taken. If all players have the consequence Rea Exhaustion and the players have run out of Fate Points to give then the GM may compel the group to accept a world aspect that grants each player one Fate Point. This aspect should reflect a massive Rea Shift in the world of Hereva. At the end of the Great War each of the Chaosah Witches were exhausted of their Rea which caused the Great Tree of Komona to break, which damaged the magic in all of Hereva. GMs, the decision of how severe the exhaustion of Rea would be for your party of witches is up to you.
Some examples:
......
Supports Markdown
0% or .
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment