content.en.tex 203 KB
Newer Older
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
% (c) 2019 by Craig Maloney
% Based off of the universe of Pepper&Carrot (FIXME)
% This file is released under CC BY 4.0. 
% This file contains material from the Nip'ajin Roleplaying Game which is licensed under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 license.
% The material is in here as a placeholder for the layout while Craig gets his bearings in LaTeX and will be removed in future releases.
% (that said, check out Nip'ajin at https://ludus-leonis.com/nipajin because it's pretty sweet!)

\renewcommand{\peppercarrotVersion}{v0.0.1}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
10
% CHANGELOG-en
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
% 0.0.1: Playtest Draft

% --- language dependent typography stuff ------------------------------

\renewcommand{\say}[1]{\textit{#1}}
\setdefaultlanguage{english}

\renewcommand{\fsNormal}{\fontsize{9.75pt}{11.25pt plus 0.1pt minus 0pt}}
\renewcommand{\fsSmall}{\fontsize{8.5pt}{9.5pt plus 0.1pt minus 0pt}}

% --- pdf metadata & stuff ---------------------------------------------

\hypersetup{
    pdftitle={Pepper\&Carrot},
	pdfauthor={Craig Maloney},
	pdfsubject={A roleplaying game set in the world of Hereva},
	pdfkeywords={peppercarrot, fate, role playing game, system, RPG}
}

\renewcommand{\backgroundlayername}{Background}

% --- fine print ---------------------------------------------------------------

\renewcommand{\peppercarrotCopyright}{\copyright\ 2019, Craig Maloney}
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotCredits}{Artwork: David Revoy; Editor: Craig Maloney}
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotFineprint}{Playtest version of the Pepper\&Carrot Role Playing Game}
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotURL}{https://peppercarrot.com/}
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotURLPrint}{peppercarrot.com/en/}

% --- language macros --------------------------------------------------

\newcommand{\eg}{e.\,g.}

% --- main texts -------------------------------------------------------

\renewcommand{\peppercarrotSummary}{%
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
47
    The \peppercarrotrpg{} is a role playing game set in the universe of Hereva where Pepper and Carrot live. This game will allow you to explore the world of Pepper\&Carrot and play a variety of characters from the comics written and illustrated by David Revoy.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
48

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
49
    This is a playtest draft. Many of the rules in here will chage over time. Roll with it.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
}

\newcommand{\peppercarrotFateLadder}{%
	\tabelle{X c}{
		\thead{Skill Level} & \thead{+/-} \\
	}{
		Legendary  & +8 \\
		Epic       & +7 \\
		Fantastic  & +6 \\
		Superb     & +5 \\
		Great      & +4 \\
		Good       & +3 \\
		Fair       & +2 \\
		Average    & +1 \\
		Mediocre   & +0 \\
		Poor       & -1 \\
		Terrible   & -2 \\
	}
}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
\newcommand{\peppercarrotDiceRoll}{%
	\tabelle{X c}{
		\thead{Dice Roll} & \thead{+/-} \\
	}{
        \dMinus{}\dPlus{}\dBlank{}\dPlus{}   & +1 \\
        \dPlus{}\dMinus{}\dBlank{}\dBlank{}  &  0 \\
        \dPlus{}\dPlus{}\dPlus{}\dMinus{}    & +2 \\
        \dMinus{}\dBlank{}\dBlank{}\dBlank{} & -1 \\
	}
}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
79

80
81
82
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotHeadlineOverview}{Overview: What is This?}
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotTocOverview}{Overview}
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotTextOverview}{%
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
83
84
85
86
    The \peppercarrotrpg{} is a role playing game set in the universe of Hereva where Pepper and Carrot live. This game will allow you to explore the world of Pepper\&Carrot and play a variety of characters from the comics written and illustrated by David Revoy.

    The \peppercarrotrpg{} is designed for 3--5 players, one of whom will play as the Game Moderator (or GM). The GM is responsible for describing the world and events of Hereva to the players. They also take the role of any characters that the players might encounter in this world. We'll have more details about what it means to be a GM later on in this book. 

87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
    You'll also need four \textbf{Fate} or \textbf{Fudge} dice. These dice are six-sided dice that have the two each of the following faces:  plus (\dPlus), minus (\dMinus), and blank (\dBlank). You can find these online or at finer hobby game stores for purchase. You can also make them yourself via several methods (either with a blank die, or with some clever marking of a six sided die). Check the appendix for more details about Fate or Fudge Dice. You may also use \textbf{The Deck of Fate} in place of, or in addition to, dice. Each player should preferably have their own set of dice or cards.
    
    Each player should have a \textbf{character sheet} (located in the back of the book), one for each player. They should also have a supply of \textbf{Index cards} or \textbf{sticky notes}.

    The \peppercarrotrpg{} requires the use of tokens, or \textbf{Fate Points}. These can be anything from \textbf{Fate Points} available from Evil Hat, poker chips, tokens from ther games, glass beads (preferably non-rolling glass beads) or anything you can find about 30--40 of for a game. (Note: \textbf{The Deck of Fate} can also be used for Fate Points.)

    \begin{figure}[H]
        \centering
        \includegraphics[scale=0.18]{../images/2019-02-27_Flight-of-Spring_by-David-Revoy.jpg}
    \end{figure}
}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
99
100
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotHeadlineTour}{Hereva: The 50Ko Tour of Komona}
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotTocTour}{Herva: The 50Ko Tour of Komona}
101
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotTextTour}{%
102
    \textit{Gather around friends for this exciting and brief tour of the City of Komona. Usually such tours go for 10 times the price, but for the price of a few Star Fruit you won't be tourists for long. I'll just tell my son to mind the shop and we'll be on our way.}
103
104
105

    Where we are is the \textbf{Komona City Market Square}. This is where folks from all over Hereva come to buy and sell their wares. It's a large bazaar where one can find most anything that you desire (as long as it's legal. \textbf{Komonan Guards} keep a tight watch on this market).

106
    We'll walk over here just outside the market to the town square. That building there? That's the office of \textbf{Miss  Saffron}, the most famous witch in all of Komona. She caused quite a stir when she won the second magic contest (the first potion contest nearly destroyed Komona. I mean, who's big idea was it to pour a growth potion on a zombified canary?). Miss Saffron's a celebrity and now all of the witches want to get her advice on anything from how to join the \textbf{Magmah school}, to relationship advice, to pretty much anything else. They say her appointment calendar is booked at least 13 months in advance. She must be something to have that kind of success.
107

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
108
    The office of \textbf{Mayor Bramble} is over there. I think the only time we ever see him is to announce another magic or potion contest. Granted these contest do bring folks into Komona, and bring in the revenue, but I'd like a little more focus on rebuilding from the first potion contest. 
109

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
110
    At the second magic contest the mayor brought in representatives from all of the magical schools. We had \textbf{Queen Coriander} from \textbf{Zombiah}, \textbf{Shichimi} from \textbf{Ah}, \textbf{Pepper} from \textbf{Chaosah}, \textbf{Spirulina} from \textbf{Aqua}, \textbf{Camomile} from \textbf{Hippiah}, and of course Miss Saffron represeting Magmah. I think this was the first time since the war that all six schools were in one location without fighting each other. Naturally Saffron won the contest, and her fame in Komona grew. As you can see there are several ad campaigns using her to pitch their products. Saffron and Queen Coriander are the two most famous witches of Hereva right now.
111

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
112
    The other big event here was the coronation of Queen Coriander in her castle in \textbf{Qualicity}. Oh, it was a lovely spectacle. We watched the coverage in the arena. Everyone who is anyone was there, including those witches from Chaosah that caused quite a spectacle. \textbf{Wasabi}, the head of the school of Ah said they were a complete disgrace with the gluttony of \textbf{Cumin}, the carrying on and cavorting of that od witch \textbf{Thyme}, and worst of all the \textit{intimidating stare} of \textbf{Cayenne}. I don't think she even blinked once during the whole coronation. And \textbf{Pepper} and her cat \textbf{Carrot} seemed to be right in the thick of things. The tabloids had a field day with that lot.
113

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
114
    If you look over that wall there you'll see the three moons peeking over the horizon. Over that way is where they say that the temples of Ah are located. They're one of the few constants in Hereva. I'm not sure where you're traveling next but you'll want to visit the Hereva Cartography Company to get their maps. Accept no substitutes! The landscape changes have been more unpredictable than usual, which means the Hereva Cartography Company business is booming selling their proprietary maps. They say it's the best way to get around Hereva. I believe them, but some still take their chances navigating around Hereva by looking for landmarks and using the stars. Of course there are a few competitors making alternate maps, but the Hereva Cartography Company maps are the best.
115

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
116
    Komona and Kerberos are both floating cities, floating by the magic power of \textbf{The Great Tree of Komona} in the center of each city. Kerberos is the more recent of the cities, formed when the great tree fractured during the war. That's where the really wealthy Komonans live, though I've yet to see any of it.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
117
118
119
120

    The great war really changed the landscape of Hereva, It certainly changed the magical schools that lost. Kerberos didn't even exist until The Great Tree of Komona nearly died during the conflict. Folks say the city was falling to the ground when suddenly a loud \textbf{boom} happened. Suddenly there was another littler tree next to The Great Tree of Komona. Some took it as a sign of a new era of Hereva, while others wondered if the war had irreparably changed Hereva forever. What I know is the real-estate developers saw an opportunity and suddenly there was a whole gated community there on Kerberos. If you get a chance to go over there I'd love to hear your tale. Heck, you might get me to part with some Ko for your tale.

    Speaking of parting with some Ko it seems our tour has concluded. I hope you enjoy the rest of your stay in Komona and do feel free to browse about the shop and let me know if I can be of any more service to you. Good Pink Moon to you all.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
121

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
122
123
124
125
    \vfill
    \noindent
    \begin{minipage}{1.0\textwidth}
        \strut\newline
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
126
        \centering
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
127
128
129
130
            \includegraphics[width=\textwidth,height=7cm]{../images/2015-11-07_wiki_place_komona_by-David-Revoy.jpg}
    \end{minipage}

    \newpage
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
131

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
132
}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
133

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
134
135
136
137
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotHeadlineHistory}{A Brief History of Hereva (Excerpt)}
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotTocHistory}{A Brief History of Hereva}
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotTextHistory}{%

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
138
    \textit{This is an excerpt from the five volume series ``The Story of Hereva'' written by W. A. Currant. In this vast series of books is the complete history of Hereva through it's different periods. It talks about what is known about early Herevans (not much), the discovery of magic in Hereva and the The Great Tree of Komona, the rise of the various magical schools, and what lead up to the great war. The final volume ends just after The Great War. It is a fascinating look at what Hereva was before the devastation. It also is the most complete document of the formation of the schools of Hereva assembled in one work. Some historians scoff at accuracy of the material, and new evidence continues to be unearthed about the early Herevans, but W. A. Currant's work still remains the most readable account of the history of Hereva.}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
139

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
    \mysection[labelDragonsofhereva]{The pre-history of Hereva}

    The Dragons have lived in the lands of Hereva long before human recollection. It wasn't until The Great Tree of Komona sprouted forth that the dragons took notice of the humans in Hereva. Why The Great Tree's appearance in Hereva coincides with the arrival of humans in draconic recollection remains a mystery. Several Komonan scholars have dedicated substantial research to look into humanity's past before The Great Tree and continue to be baffled at the lack of conclusive evidence to resolve this question. Many conversations with the dragons about the origin of humans in Hereva prove inconsistent at best and obfuscated at worst. One theory is that the dragons simply did not pay any attention to the humans until they wielded magic (much in the same way that humans don't pay attention to the ants until they start building superstructures in their back yard). Another theory is the dragons purposefully obfuscate human history, answering in riddles and conflicting details in the hopes of keeping humans away from some hidden lore about their existence prior to arriving in Hereva.

    Another prevailing theory is that the Dragons were involved in a war which brought about the formation of The Great Tree of Komona and the presence of humans. The theory posits that because most of recorded history starts with the discovery of The Great Tree of Komona then there is a direct connection between the Great Tree of Komona and the awakening of humans in Hereva. The theory splinters into two separate sub-theories. The first is that the humans were somehow magically uplifted from their primitive beginnings. Unfortunately there is little archaeological evidence to support this theory. The second is that the humans were brought from another universe and quickly adapted to the magic of Hereva. This is the more widely-accepted theory, but the question of who or what brought the humans and where they came from is still a mystery. Some believe the dragons of Hereva played a key role, but the dragons have proved unreliable and unwilling to provide any answers.

    The only thing that all Komonan scholars know for certain is that recorded history of humans in Hereva is relatively short and that it somehow coincides with The Great Tree of Komona and the dragons taking notice of humanity. 

\mysection[labelGreatTree]{The Formation of Magic}

    Speculation abounds over what happened before magic was discovered in Hereva, but what is clear is Hereva matured quickly once magic entered the realm. The Great Tree of Komona figures prominently in the folklore of Hereva and its arrival signaled the birth of the magical age. None of the written records predate the blooming of The Great Tree, and some speculate that The Great Tree is really when Hereva came into existence. So significant is the sprouting of the great tree that it is marked as year 0 in the Hereva calendar. Events before the sprouting of The Great Tree are referred to as ``Before The Great Tree'' (usually shortened to ``Before Times''). Events after the sprouting of The Great Tree are not given any special distinction and are referred to by their year. The thought is that anything before the sprouting of The Great Tree is ancient history that is only of use to nosy scholars who like to talk to meddlesome and misdirecting dragons.

\mysection[labelBlossomingofhereva]{The Blossoming of Hereva}

    With the discovery of magic Hereva transformed overnight. Grunts and gestures gave way to the written word and spoken language. Incantations were discovered and recorded, and before long schools formed to collect the various spells into books. So many spells were discovered that it was impossible to keep up and the schools began to specialize into the disciplines known to Hereva today. Some were open and welcoming to new members, but others remained more secretive and aloof. Schools like Hippiah, Magmah and Zombiah found ways to take the drudgery out of day-to-day existence, whereas Chaosah preferred spells to control and direct the universe itself in minute detail.

For centuries these schools lived in harmony. Occasionally there were squabbles and bickering but everything remained civil between the schools. By most accounts the only school that caused any trouble before the war was Chaosah, and that was because of their tendency to play pranks on the other schools. One such prank by Chaosah would involve the leaving around spell books entitled ``Chaosah Secrets'' full of nonsense spells, or potions that rarely did what they said on the label. One such potion accidentally made its way back to the shelves of Chaosah where an unfortunate student made the discovery. The student realized (too late) that the potion labeled ``Potion of Invisibility'' was actually A ``Potion of Divisibility'', and the hapless student disappeared in a puff of mathematical improbabilities.

\mysection[labelWarsmagmahaquah]{The Great War}

In 252 there was a brutal and all-encompassing war between the Magmah and Aquah schools. What started as a simple disagreement between Magmah and Aquah escalated into assaults on each other. Both schools enlisted aid from any schools they could and dragged whomever they could into the conflict.

During the years leading up to the war Chaosah grew in strength. They played Magmah and Aquah against each other and were responsible for escalating a few skirmishes into an all-out war.  The fighting spread, and the other schools were dragged into the conflict. Zombiah quickly learned they could not supply both Magmah and Aquah with materials for their weapons without the other school finding out. Once Magmah learned that Zombiah was supplying materials to Aquah and Aquah learned that Zombiah was supplying materials to Magmah then both Magmah and Aquah declared war on Zombiah. Zombiah took heavy losses during the attacks from both schools and used their magic to animate and re-animate both mechanical constructs and fallen warriors. Hippiah tried to stay neutral but in the wake of starvation they caved and used their magic to help supply any who came to them with food and shelter.

Later in the war the schools devised spells of unspeakable power that summoned the nastiest and most brutal forms of destruction. The Elemental Battles saw Magmah and Aquah summoning up elementals to do battle. Fire elementals clashed with water elementals in combat. Whole areas were wiped out either by fire or flood. Zombiah learned how to make earth elementals to try to defend themselves from the ensuing onslaught. Hippiah summoned trees and plants to fortify their borders. But Chaosah would not be outdone and summoned the Chaosah Demons to battle against these elemental forces.

Nobody is quite sure why The High Council of Ah remained silent for most of the war, but historians point to two significant events that lead to their entry in 254. The first was Ah noticing that Zombiah was re-animating their fallen warriors in large numbers. The predominant theory explains that such a large reanimation caused a disturbance in the spirit world, and Ah could not help but interfere swiftly to prevent such a disturbance. The second event was Ah realizing that Chaosah were stoking the fires of this conflict into an all-out war. Worse, Chaosah were using their advanced inter-dimensional knowledge to poke holes into Hereva itself. The Chaosah Demons were brought to Hereva as part of Chaosah's inter-dimensional poking. The dimensional spells and black-holes of Chaosah are believed to have caused one of the final events in the great war. The theory holds that The Great Tree of Komona was the last defense against the eventual annihilation of the reality of Hereva, and if left unchecked Chaosah would have poked enough holes in Hereva to cause irreparable harm. Regardless of the true reason, Ah joined the fighting and immediately went after the witches of Chaosah. Ah systematically banished the Chaosah Demons and destroyed each witch of Chaosah in turn until only Cayenne, Thyme and Cumin remained.

Defiant, Cayenne and Thyme fought the forces of Ah. Cumin tried to escape but was picked off. Cayenne held an offensive position while Thyme attempted to summon up reinforcements. Unfortunately Thyme had not planned on the ferocity of Ah's assault, and her spell began to use up the available Rea from the surrounding area. Cayenne was unable to block the power drain and both her and Thyme were ill-prepared for the ensuing rupture that killed them. It took several adepts of Ah to try to contain flow of Rea. The Great Tree, unbalanced by the destruction of Chaosah spewed Rea throughout Hereva with such force that it blew one of the limbs off of the tree (which later became Kerberos). The resulting shock-wave of Rea from The Great Tree explosion disrupted the rupture long enough for it to seal.

But the damage was done. With Chaosah destroyed, the magic of Hereva was deteriorating rapidly. Ah enlisted Zombiah to revive what it could of Chaosah. Cumin was revived but that was not enough to restore balance. Reluctantly Thyme and Cayenne were revived and charged with finding a true heir to carry on the Chaosah school and train them. Chaosah was put under careful watch to ensure they were indeed training their school's heir.

The remaining members from the magic schools were assembled and a treaty was brokered, the results of which are stored in a magic lock-box visible only to select members of the schools. With the treaty came an end to the fighting and bloodshed that almost destroyed Hereva.

The High Council of Ah determined that both Magmah and Aquah were to blame for the conflict. Because Magmah and Aquah began this conflict The High Council of Ah ruled that both Magmah and Aquah should suffer the ultimate shame of being re-named by the other school for 10 years. Magmah renamed Aquah as Wharrgarblah, and Aquah renamed Magmah as Kielbasah. The records for both schools changed immediately, and all references to the schools were magically altered to use the new names. Having served their sentences the names Wharrgarblah and Kielbasah have since reverted back to their original names (Aquah and Magmah respectively).

Soon after the treaty Zombiah focused on animating constructs and creating stronger materials. It's unclear if Ah was responsible for Zombiah's change in focus, or if it became more economical to animate constructs than re-animate the dead. Only those with access to the lock-box know the truth.

As additional penance each school also surrendered their spellbooks that were used in the war to Ah. Each school sent their book to Ah for safekeeping. Wasabi keeps them all on display as a reminder of their victory in The Great War and to prevent further hostilities. (Though there has been some talk that the book that Chaosah submitted doesn't look much like a spellbook, and they still possess the ability to summon demons at will).
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
179
180


181
\newpage
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
182
183
}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
184
185
186
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotHeadlineCharacter}{Character Creation}
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotTocCharacter}{Character Creation}
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotTextCharacter}{%
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
187

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
188
189
190
    \textit{Players in \peppercarrotrpg{} portray witches in the magical schools of Hereva. They can be students in their first year, highly gifted students, or even the leaders of the magical schools. Other characters are possible but for this chapter we're going to focus on how to make a witch in the world of Hereva.}

    In this section we'll describe how to make a Witch to play in the world of Hereva. Witches are some of the most powerful humans in Hereva. Each step of this process will guide you in creating your character.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
191

192
\mysection[labelHowDoIMakeACharacter]{How Do I Make a Character?}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
193

194
Now it's time to start writing stuff down. Grab a pencil and a copy of the character sheet. Some people like to use form-fillable PDFs on a laptop or tablet computer. Any of that's fine, but you definitely want something that lets you erase and change.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
195

196
\mysection[labelAspectsinaNutshell]{Aspects in a Nutshell}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
197

198
An~aspect~is a word, phrase, or sentence that describes something centrally important to your character. It can be a motto your character lives by, a personality quirk, a description of a relationship you have with another character, an important possession or bit of equipment your character has, or any other part of your character that is vitally important.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
199

200
Aspects allow you to change the story in ways that tie in with your character's tendencies, skills, or problems. You can also use them to~\hyperref[Anchor-14]{\textbf{establish facts about the setting}}, such as the presence of a certain type of magic, or the existence of a useful ally, dangerous enemy, or secret organization.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
201

202
Your character will have a handful of aspects (between three and five), including a~high concept~and a~trouble. We discuss aspects in detail in~\hyperref[aspects]{\emph{Aspects and Fate Points}}---but for now, this should help you get the idea.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
203

204
\subsection[labelHighConcept]{High Concept}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
205

206
First, decide on your character's~high concept. This is a single phrase or sentence that neatly sums up your character, saying who you are, what you do, what your ``deal'' is. When you think about your high concept, try to think of two things: how this aspect could help you, and how it might make things harder for you. Good high concept aspects do both.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
207

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
208
\sectionruler{}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
209

210
Examples:~New student of Magmah;~Former apprentice to the head teacher of Aquah;~Wandering priestess of Ah.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
211

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
212
\sectionruler{}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
213

214
\subsubsection{Trouble}\label{labelTrouble}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
215

216
Next, decide on the thing that always gets you into~trouble. It could be a personal weakness, or a recurring enemy, or an important obligation---anything that makes your life complicated.  
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
217
\sectionruler{}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
218

219
Examples:~I need to prove myself;~Never enough Ko;~Tempted by shiny things
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
220

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
221
\sectionruler{}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
222

223
\subsubsection{Another Aspect}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f11}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
224

225
Now compose another aspect. Think of something really important or interesting about your character. Are they the strongest person in their hometown? Do they have a reputation known across different schools? Do they talk too much? Are they filthy rich?
226
227
228
229

\subsubsection{Optional: One or Two Additional
Aspects}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f12}

230
If you wish, you may create one or two more aspects. These aspects might describe your character's relationship with other player characters or with an NPC\@. Or, like the third aspect you composed above, it might describe something especially interesting about your character.
231

232
If you prefer, you can leave one or both of these aspects blank right now and fill them in later, after the game has started.
233
234
235
236
237

\subsubsection{Name and Appearance}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f13}

Describe your character's appearance and give them a name.

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
238
\sectionruler{}
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254

\textbf{CREATING CHARACTERS:~THE 30-SECOND VERSION}

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
  \hyperref[Anchor-13]{Write two aspects}: a high concept and a trouble.
\item
  Write another aspect.
\item
  Give your character a name and describe their appearance.
\item
  \hyperref[Anchor-15]{Choose approaches}.
\item
  Set your refresh to 3.
\item
255
  You may write up to two more aspects and~\hyperref[Anchor-16]{choose a stunt}~if you wish, or you may do that during play.
256
257
\end{itemize}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
258
\sectionruler{}
259
260
261
262
263

\subsubsection{Approaches\\}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f14}

Choose your~approaches.

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
264
Approaches are descriptions of~how~you accomplish tasks. Everyone has the same six approaches:
265
266
267
268
269
270
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279
280
281

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
  Careful
\item
  Clever
\item
  Flashy
\item
  Forceful
\item
  Quick
\item
  Sneaky
\end{itemize}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
282
Each approach is rated with a bonus. Choose one at Good~(+3), two at Fair~(+2), two at Average~(+1), and one at Mediocre~(+0). You can improve these later. We talk about~\hyperref[sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f15]{what each approach means}~and how you use them in~\hyperref[how]{\emph{How to Do Stuff: Outcomes,
283
284
Approaches, and Actions}}.

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
285
\sectionruler{}
286
287
288

\textbf{THE LADDER}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
289
In Fate, we use a ladder of adjectives and numbers to rate a character's approaches, the result of a roll, difficulty ratings for simple checks, etc.
290
291
292

Here's the ladder:

293
\peppercarrotFateLadder{}
294

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
295
\sectionruler{}
296
297
298
299
300
301

Your approaches can say a lot about who you are. Here are some examples:

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
302
  The Brute:\\ Forceful +3, Careful and Flashy +2, Sneaky and Quick +1, Clever +0
303
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
304
  The All-Star:\\ Quick +3, Forceful and Flashy +2, Clever and Careful~+1, Sneaky +0
305
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
306
  The Trickster:\\ Clever +3, Sneaky and Flashy +2, Forceful and Quick~+1, Careful +0
307
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
308
  The Guardian:\\ Careful +3, Forceful and Clever +2, Sneaky and Quick~+1, Flashy +0
309
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
310
  The Thief:\\ Sneaky +3, Careful and Quick +2, Clever and Flashy +1, Forceful +0
311
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
312
  The Swashbuckler:\\ Flashy +3, Quick and Clever +2, Forceful and Sneaky +1, Careful +0
313
314
315
316
\end{itemize}

\subsubsection{Stunts and Refresh}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f16}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
317
318
319
A~stunt~is a special trait that changes the way an approach works for your character. Generally, stunts give you a bonus (almost always +2) to a certain approach when used with a particular action under specific circumstances. We'll talk more about stunts in~\hyperref[stunts]{\emph{Stunts}}. Choose one stunt to start, or you can wait and add a stunt during the game. Later, when your character advances, you can choose more.

Your~refresh~is the number of fate points you begin each game session with---unless you ended the previous session with more unspent fate points than your refresh, in which case you start with the number you had left last time. By default, your refresh starts at three and is reduced by one for each stunt~after~the first three you choose---essentially, your first three stunts are free! As your character advances, you'll get opportunities to add to your refresh.  Your refresh may never go below one.
320

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
321
\sectionruler{}
322
323
324

\textbf{HOW MANY STUNTS?}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
325
By default,~Fate Accelerated Edition~suggests choosing one stunt to start with.
326

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
327
However, if this is your first time playing a Fate game, you might find it easier to pick your first stunt after you've had a chance to play a bit, to give you an idea of what a good stunt might be. Just add your stunt during or after your first game session.
328

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
329
On the other hand, if you're an experienced Fate gamer, you might look ahead and discover that, just like in~Fate Core, your character is entitled to three free stunts before it starts costing you refresh. In that case, let the least experienced member of your game group be your guide; if someone is new to the game and only takes one to start with, that's what everyone should do. If you're all experienced, and you want to start with more powerful characters, just take all three to start and off you go.
330

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
331
Each character may select the two school stunts that are provided. Certain characters, like Pepper, may not want or be able to take one of the school stunts. Chaosah's ability to intimidate others by being Chaosah witches does not fit Pepper's character, so she selects a different stunt instead.
332

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
333
Remember that your character can change or add additional stunts at a milestone. Perhaps later in the game Pepper becomes a powerful Chaosah witch. She can later choose to trade one of her current stunts for the Chaosah Intimidate stunt. Or Shichimi might decide to become less like an Ah student and remove one of the Ah stunts for something she prefers. 
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
334

335
If your character decides to change schools (e.g.\: your character was part of Hippiah school but gets recruited by Chaosah Witches) you may do this at a major milestone. You may remove one or both of your current school's stunts. As your character learns the ways of their new school you may substitute or add the new school's stunts at each minor milestone. 
336

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
337
\sectionruler{}
338
339
340
341

\section{HowTo Do Stuff:~Outcomes, Actions, and
Approaches}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f17}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
342
343
344
345
346
Now it's time to start doing something. You need to leap from one flying broom to another. You need to search the entire library for that spell you really need. You need to distract the guard so you can sneak into the fortress. How do you figure out what happens?

First you narrate what your character is trying to do. Your character's own aspects provide a good guide for what you~can~do. If you have an aspect that suggests you can perform magic, then cast that spell. If your aspects describe you as a swordsman, draw that blade and have at it. These story details don't have additional mechanical impact. You don't get a bonus from your magic or your sword, unless you choose to spend a fate point to~invoke~an appropriate~\hyperref[Anchor-18]{aspect}. Often, the ability to use an aspect to make something true in the story is bonus enough!

How do you know if you're successful? Often, you just succeed, because the action isn't hard and nobody's trying to stop you. But if failure provides an interesting twist in the story, or if something unpredictable could happen, you need to break out the~dice.
347

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
348
\sectionruler{}
349

350
\textbf{TAKING ACTION\@: THE 30-SECOND VERSION}
351
352
353
354

\begin{enumerate}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
355
  Describe what you want your character to do. Determine if someone or something can stop you.\\
356
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
357
  Decide what action you're taking: create an advantage, overcome, attack, or defend.\\
358
359
360
361
362
363
364
365
366
367
\item
  Decide on your approach.\\
\item
  Roll dice and add your approach's bonus.\\
\item
  Decide whether to modify your roll with aspects.\\
\item
  Figure out your outcome.\\
\end{enumerate}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
368
\sectionruler{}
369
370
371

\subsection{Dice or Cards}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f18}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
372
Part of determining your outcome is generating a random number, which is usually done in one of two ways: rolling four Fate Dice, or drawing a card from a Deck of Fate.
373

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
374
\textbf{Fate Dice}:~Fate Dice (sometimes called \textbf{Fudge dice}, after the game they were originally designed for) are one way to determine outcomes. You always roll Fate Dice in a set of four. Each die will come up as~\dPlus,~\dBlank, or~\dMinus, and you add them together to get the total of the roll. For example:
375

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
376
\peppercarrotDiceRoll{}
377

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
378
\textbf{Deck of Fate}:~The Deck of Fate is a deck of cards that copies the statistical spread of Fate Dice. You can choose to use them instead of dice---either one works great.
379

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
380
\sectionruler{}
381

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
382
These rules are written with the assumption that you're rolling Fate Dice, but use whichever one your group prefers. Anytime you're told to roll dice, that also means you can draw from the Deck of Fate instead.\\
383

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
384
\sectionruler{}
385
386
387

\hyperdef{}{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f15}{\subsection{Outcomes}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f15}}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
388
Once you roll your dice, add your approach bonus (we'll talk about that in a moment) and any bonuses from aspects or stunts. Compare the total to a target number, which is either a~\hyperref[Setting-Difficulty-Levels]{fixed difficulty}~or the result of the GM's roll for an NPC. Based on that comparison, your outcome is:
389
390
391
392
393
394
395
396
397
398

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
  You~fail~if your total is~less than~your opponent's total.
\item
  It's a~tie~if your total is~equal to~your opponent's total.
\item
  You~succeed~if your total is~greater than~your opponent's total.
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
399
  You~succeed with style~if your total is at least~three greater than~your opponent's total.
400
401
\end{itemize}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
402
Now that we've covered outcomes, we can talk about actions and how the outcomes work with them.
403
404
405

\subsection{Actions}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f19}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
406
So you've narrated what your PC is trying to do, and you've established that there's a chance you could fail. Next, figure out what~action~best describes what you're trying to do. There are four basic actions that cover anything you do in the game.
407
408
409

\subsubsection{Create an Advantage}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f20}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
410
Creating an advantage~is anything you do to try to help yourself or one of your friends. Taking a moment to very carefully aim your proton blaster, spending several hours doing research in the school library, or tripping the thug who's trying to rob you---these all count as creating an advantage. The target of your action may get a chance to use the defend action to stop you. The advantage you create lets you do one of the following three things:
411
412
413
414
415
416

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
  Create a new situation~\hyperref[Situation-Aspects]{aspect}.
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
417
  Discover an existing situation~\hyperref[Character-Aspects]{aspect}~or another character's aspect that you didn't know about.
418
419
420
421
422
423
424
\item
  Take advantage of an existing~\hyperref[aspects]{aspect}.
\end{itemize}

If you're creating a new aspect or discovering an existing one:

\begin{itemize}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
425
426
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
    \item
427
    \textbf{If you fail:}~Either you don't create or discover the aspect at all, or you create or discover it but an opponent~gets to invoke the aspect for free. The second option works best if the aspect you create or discover is something that other people could take advantage of (like~Rough Terrain). You may have to reword the aspect to show that it benefits the other character instead of you---work it out in whatever way makes the most sense with the player who gets the free invocation. You can still invoke the aspect if you'd like, but it'll cost you a fate point.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
428
429
430
431
432
433
    \item
    \textbf{If you tie:}~If you're creating a new aspect, you get a~\hyperref[Boosts]{\textbf{boost}}. Name it and invoke it once for free---after that, the boost goes away. If you're trying to discover an existing aspect, treat this as a success (see below).
    \item
    \textbf{If you succeed:} You create or discover the aspect, and you or an ally may invoke it once for free. Write the aspect on an index card or sticky note and place it on the table.
    \item
    \textbf{If you succeed with style:} You create or discover the aspect, and you or an ally may invoke it~twice~for free. Usually you can't invoke the same aspect twice on the same roll, but this is an exception; success with style gives you a BIG advantage!
434
435
436
437
438
439
440
\end{itemize}

If you're trying to take advantage of an aspect you already know about:

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
441
  If you fail:~You don't get any additional benefit from the aspect. You can still invoke it in the future if you'd like, at the cost of a fate point.
442
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
443
  If you tie or succeed:~You get one free invocation on the aspect for you or an ally to use later. You might want to draw a circle or a box on the aspect's note card, and check it off when that invocation is used.
444
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
445
  If you succeed with style:~You get~two~free invocations on the aspect, which you can let an ally use, if you wish.
446
447
\end{itemize}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
448
\sectionruler{}
449
450
451
452
453
454
455
456

\textbf{ACTIONS \& OUTCOMES:~THE 30-SECOND VERSION}

\textbf{Create an Advantage when creating or discovering aspects:}

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
457
  \textbf{Fail:}~Don't create or discover, or you do but your opponent (not you) gets a free invocation.
458
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
459
  \textbf{Tie:}~Get a~boost~if creating new, or treat as success if looking for existing.
460
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
461
  \textbf{Succeed:}~Create or discover the aspect, get a free invocation on~it.
462
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
463
  \textbf{Succeed with Style:~}Create or discover the aspect, get two free invocations on it.
464
465
466
467
468
469
470
471
472
473
474
475
476
\end{itemize}

\textbf{Create an Advantage on an aspect you already know about:}

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
  \textbf{Fail:}~No additional benefit.
\item
  \textbf{Tie}:~Generate one free invocation on the aspect.
\item
  \textbf{Succeed:}~Generate one free invocation on the aspect.
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
477
  \textbf{Succeed with Style:}~Generate two free invocations on the aspect.
478
479
480
481
482
483
484
\end{itemize}

\textbf{Overcome:}

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
485
  \textbf{Fail:}~Fail, or succeed at a serious cost.
486
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
487
  \textbf{Tie:}~Succeed at minor cost.
488
489
490
\item
  \textbf{Succeed:}~You accomplish your goal.
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
491
  \textbf{Succeed with Style:}~You accomplish your goal and generate a~boost.
492
493
494
495
496
497
498
499
500
\end{itemize}

\textbf{Attack:}

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
  \textbf{Fail:}~No effect.
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
501
  \textbf{Tie:}~Attack doesn't harm the target, but you gain a boost.
502
503
504
\item
  \textbf{Succeed:}~Attack hits and causes damage.
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
505
  \textbf{Succeed with Style:}~Attack hits and causes damage.  May reduce damage by one to generate a boost.
506
507
508
509
510
511
512
513
514
515
516
\end{itemize}

\textbf{Defend:}

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
  \textbf{Fail:}~You suffer the consequences of your opponent's success.
\item
  \textbf{Tie:}~Look at your opponent's action to see what happens.
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
517
  \textbf{Succeed:}~Your opponent doesn't get what they want.
518
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
519
  \textbf{Succeed with Style:}~Your opponent doesn't get what they want, and you get a boost.
520
521
\end{itemize}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
522
\sectionruler{}
523
524
525

\subsubsection{Overcome}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f21}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
526
You use the~\textbf{\hyperref[Setting-Difficulty-Levels]{overcome}~}action when you have to get past something that's between you and a particular goal---picking a lock, escaping from handcuffs, leaping across a chasm, flying a spaceship through an asteroid field. Taking some action to~\hyperref[get-rid-of-a-situation-aspect]{eliminate or change an inconvenient situation aspect}~is usually an overcome action; we'll talk more about that in~Aspects and Fate Points. The target of your action may get a chance to use the defend action to stop you.
527
528
529
530

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
531
532
533
534
535
536
537
  If you fail:~You have a tough choice to make. You can simply fail---the door is still locked, the thug still stands between you and the exit, the guards are still~On Your Tail. Or you can succeed, but at a serious cost---maybe you drop something vital you were carrying, maybe you suffer harm. The GM helps you figure out an appropriate cost.
\item
  If you tie:~You attain your goal, but at some minor cost. The GM could introduce a complication, or present you with a tough choice (you can rescue one of your friends, but not the other), or some other twist.  See~``Succeed at a Cost''~in~Running the Game~in~Fate Core~for more ideas.
\item
  If you succeed:~You accomplish what you were trying to do. The lock springs open, you duck around the thug blocking the door, you manage to lose the guards on your tail.
\item
  If you succeed with style:~As success (above), but you also gain a boost.
538
539
540
541
\end{itemize}

\subsubsection{Attack}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f22}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
542
Use an~attack~when you try to hurt someone, whether physically or mentally---swinging a sword, shooting off a fireball spell, or yelling a blistering insult with the intent to hurt your target. (We'll talk about this in~Ouch! Damage, Stress, and Consequences, but the important thing is: If someone gets hurt too badly, they're knocked out of the scene.) The target of your attack gets a chance to use the defend action to stop you.
543
544
545
546

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
547
  If you fail:~Your attack doesn't connect. The target parries your sword, your spell misses, your target laughs off your insult.
548
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
549
  If you tie:~Your attack doesn't connect strongly enough to cause any harm, but you gain a boost.
550
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
551
  If you succeed:~Your attack hits and you do damage.  See~\hyperref[ouch]{\emph{Ouch! Damage, Stress, and Consequences}}.
552
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
553
  If you succeed with style:~You hit and~\hyperref[Anchor-22]{do damage}, plus you have the option to reduce the damage your hit causes by one and gain a boost.
554
555
556
557
\end{itemize}

\subsubsection{Defend}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f23}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
558
Use~defend~when you're actively trying to stop someone from doing any of the other three actions---you're parrying a sword strike, trying to stay on your feet, blocking a doorway, and the like. Usually this action is performed on someone else's turn, reacting to their attempt to attack, overcome, or create an advantage. You may also roll to oppose some non-attack actions, or to defend against an attack on someone else, if you can explain why you can. Usually it's fine if most people at the table agree that it's reasonable, but you can also point to an relevant situation aspect to justify it. When you do, you become the target for any bad results.
559
560
561
562

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
563
  If you fail:~You're on the receiving end of whatever your opponent's success gives them.
564
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
565
  If you tie or succeed:~Things don't work out too badly for you; look at the description of your opponent's action to see what happens.
566
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
567
  If you succeed with style:~Your opponent doesn't get what they want, plus you gain a boost.
568
569
570
571
\end{itemize}

\subsubsection{Getting Help}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f24}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
572
An ally can help you perform your action. When an ally helps you, they give up their action for the exchange and describe how they're providing the help; you get a +1 to your roll for each ally that helps this way.  Usually only one or two people can help this way before they start getting in each other's way; the GM decides how many people can help at once.
573
574
575

\subsection{Choose Your Approach}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f25}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
576
As we mentioned in~\hyperref[Who]{Who Do You Want to Be?},~there are six~approaches~that describe how you perform actions.
577
578
579
580

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
581
582
583
584
585
586
587
588
589
590
591
  Careful:~A Careful action is when you pay close attention to detail and take your time to do the job right. Lining up a long-range arrow shot. Attentively standing watch. Disarming a trap near Pepper's house.
\item
  Clever:~A Clever action requires that you think fast, solve problems, or account for complex variables. Finding the weakness in an enemy swordsman's style. Finding the weak point in a fortress wall. Fixing a clockwork servant.
\item
  Flashy:~A Flashy action draws attention to you; it's full of style and panache. Delivering an inspiring speech to the other students in your school. Embarrassing your opponent in a duel. Producing a magical fireworks display.
\item
  Forceful:~A Forceful action isn't subtle---it's brute strength.  Wrestling a phanda. Staring down a thug. Casting a big, powerful magic spell.
\item
  Quick:~A Quick action requires that you move quickly and with dexterity. Dodging an arrow. Getting in the first punch. Disarming a bomb as it ticks 3\ldots{} 2\ldots{} 1\ldots{}
\item
  Sneaky:~A Sneaky action is done with an emphasis on misdirection, stealth, or deceit. Talking your way out of getting arrested. Picking a pocket. Feinting in a sword fight.
592
593
\end{itemize}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
594
595
596
597
598
599
600
601
602
Each character has each approach rated with a bonus from +0 to +3. Add the bonus to your dice roll to determine how well your PC performs the action you described.

So your first instinct is probably to pick the action that gives you the greatest bonus, right? But it doesn't work like that. You have to base your choice of approach on the description of your action, and you can't describe an action that doesn't make any sense. Would you Forcefully creep through a dark room, hiding from the guards? No, that's being Sneaky. Would you Quickly push that big rock out of the way of the wagon? No, that's being Forceful. Circumstances constrain what approach you can use, so sometimes you have to go with an approach that might not play directly to your strengths.

\subsection{Roll the Dice, Add Your Bonus}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f26}

Time to take up dice and roll. Take the bonus associated with the approach you've chosen and add it to the result on the dice. If you have a stunt that applies, add that too. That's your total. Compare it to what your opponent (usually the GM) has.

\subsection{Decide Whether to Modify the Roll}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f27}
603
604

Finally, decide whether you want to alter your roll
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
605
by~\hyperref[Anchor-18]{invoking aspects}---we'll talk about this a lot in Aspects and Fate Points.
606
\newpage
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
607
608
609

}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
610
611
612
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotHeadlineChallenges}{Challenges, Contests, and Conflicts}
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotTocChallenges}{Challenges, Contests, and Conflicts}
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotTextChallenges}{%
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
613

614
We've talked about the four actions (create an advantage, overcome, attack, and defend) and the four outcomes (fail, tie, succeed, and succeed with style). But in what framework do those happen?
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
615

616
Usually, when you want to do something straightforward---swim across a raging river, hack someone's cell phone---all you need to do is make one overcome action~\hyperref[Setting-Difficulty-Levels]{against a difficulty level}~that the GM sets. You look at your outcome and go from there.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
617

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
618
But sometimes things are a little more complex.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
619

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
620
\subsection{Challenges}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f29}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
621

622
A~challenge~is a series of overcome and create an advantage actions that you use to resolve an especially complicated situation. Each overcome action deals with one task or part of the situation, and you take the individual results together to figure out how the situation resolves.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
623

624
To set up a challenge, decide what individual tasks or goals make up the situation, and treat each one as a separate overcome roll.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
625

626
Depending on the situation, one character may be required to make several rolls, or multiple characters may be able to participate. GMs, you aren't obligated to announce all the stages in the challenge ahead of time---adjust the steps as the challenge unfolds to keep things exciting.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
627

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
628
\sectionruler{}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
629

630
The PCs are the crew of an airship caught in a storm. They decide to press on and try to get to their destination despite the weather, and the GM suggests this sounds like a challenge. Steps in resolving this challenge could be calming panicky passengers, repairing damaged rigging, and keeping the ship on the right heading.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
631

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
632
\sectionruler{}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
633

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
634
\subsection{Contests}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f30}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
635

636
637
638
639
640
641
642
When two or more characters are competing against one another for the same goal, but not directly trying to hurt each other, you have a~contest. Examples include a broom chase, a public debate, or an archery tournament.

A contest proceeds in a series of exchanges. In an exchange, every participant takes one overcome action to determine how well they do in that leg of the contest. Compare your result to everyone else's.

If you got the highest result, you win the exchange---you score a victory (which you can represent with a tally or check mark on scratch paper) and describe how you take the lead. If you succeed with style, you mark two victories.

If there's a tie, no one gets a victory, and an unexpected twist occurs.  This could mean several things, depending on the situation---the terrain or environment shifts somehow, the parameters of the contest change, or an unanticipated variable shows up and affects all the participants. The GM~\hyperref[Situation-Aspects]{creates a new situation
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
643
aspect~}reflecting this change and puts it into play.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
644

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
645
The first participant to achieve three victories wins the contest.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
646

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
647
\subsection{Conflicts}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f31}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
648

649
Conflicts~are used to resolve situations where characters are trying to harm one another. It could be physical harm (a sword fight, a witches' duel, a battle using spells), but it could also be mental harm (a shouting match, a tough interrogation, a magical psychic blast).
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
650

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
651
\sectionruler{}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
652

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
653
\textbf{CONFLICTS:~THE 30-SECOND VERSION}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
654

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
655
656
\begin{enumerate}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
657
658
659
\item Set the scene.
\item Determine turn order.
\item Start the first exchange.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
660
\end{enumerate}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
661

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
662
663
\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
664
\item On your turn, take an action.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
665
666
667
668
\end{itemize}

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
669
670
\item On other people's turns, defend against or respond to their actions as necessary.
\item At the end of everyone's turn, start a new exchange or end the conflict.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
671
672
\end{itemize}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
673
\sectionruler{}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
674
675

\subsubsection{Setting the Scene}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f32}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
676

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
677
Establish what's going on, where everyone is, and what the environment is like. Who is the opposition? The GM should write a couple of situation aspects on sticky notes or index cards and place them on the table. Players~\href{}{can suggest situation aspects}, too.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
678

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
679
The GM also establishes~zones, loosely defined areas that tell you where characters are. You determine zones based on the scene and the following guidelines:
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
680

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
681
Generally, you can interact with other characters in the same zone---or in nearby zones if you can justify acting at a distance (for example, if you have a ranged weapon or magic spell).
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
682

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
683
You can move one zone for free. An action is required to move if there's an obstacle along the way, such as someone trying to stop you, or if you want to move two or more zones. It sometimes helps to sketch a quick map to illustrate zones.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
684

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
685
\sectionruler{}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
686

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
687
Thugs are attacking the characters at Pepper's house. The living room is one zone, the kitchen another, the front porch another, and the yard a fourth. Anyone in the same zone can easily throw punches at each other.  From the living room, you can throw things at people in the kitchen or move into the kitchen as a free action, unless the doorway is blocked.  To get from the living room to the front porch or yard requires an action.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
688

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
689
\sectionruler{}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
690

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
691
\subsubsection{Determine Turn Order}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f33}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
692

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
693
Your turn order in a conflict is based on your approaches. In a physical conflict, compare your Quick approach to the other participants'---the one with the fastest reflexes goes first. In a mental conflict, compare your Careful approach---attention to detail will warn you of danger.  Whoever has the highest approach gets to go first, and then everyone else goes in descending order. Break ties in whatever manner makes sense, with the GM having the last word.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
694

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
695
GMs, it's simplest if you pick your most advantageous NPC to determine your place in the turn order, and let all your NPCs go at that time. But if you have a good reason to determine turn order individually for all your NPCs, go right ahead.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
696

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
697
\subsubsection{Exchanges}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f34}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
698

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
699
Next, each character takes a turn in order. On their turn, a character can take one of the~\hyperref[Anchor-24]{four actions}. Resolve the action to determine the outcome. The conflict is over when only one side has characters still in the fight.  
700
\newpage
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
701
702
}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
703
704
705
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotHeadlineDamage}{Ouch!~Damage, Stress, and Consequences}
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotTocDamage}{Ouch!~Damage, Stress, and Consequences}
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotTextDamage}{%
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
706

707
When you're hit by an attack, the severity of the hit is the difference between the attack roll and your defense roll; we measure that in~shifts. For instance, if your opponent gets +5 on their attack and you get a +3 on your defense, the attack deals a two shift hit ($5 - 3 = 2$).
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
708
709
710
711
712
713
714
715
716
717
718

Then, one of two things happens:

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
  You suffer~stress~and/or~consequences, but you stay in the fight.
\item
  You get~taken out, which means you're out of the action for a while.
\end{itemize}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
719
\sectionruler{}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
720
721
722
723
724
725
726
727
728
729

\textbf{STRESS \& CONSEQUENCES:~THE 30-SECOND VERSION}

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
  Each character starts with three stress boxes.
\item
  Severity of hit (in shifts)\\ = Attack Roll -- Defense Roll
\item
730
  When you take a hit, you need to account for how that hit damages you.  One way to absorb the damage is to take stress; you can check one stress box to handle some or all of a single hit. You can absorb a number of shifts equal to the number of the box you check: one for Box 1, two for Box 2, three for Box 3.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
731
\item
732
  You may also take one or more consequences to deal with the hit, by marking off one or more consequence slots and writing a new aspect for each one. Mild consequence = 2 shifts; moderate = 4 shifts; severe = 6 shifts.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
733
\item
734
  If you can't (or decide not to) handle the entire hit, you're taken out. Your opponent decides what happens to you.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
735
\item
736
  Giving in before your opponent's roll allows you to control how you exit the scene. You also get one or more fate points for doing~this!
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
737
\item
738
  Stress and mild consequences vanish at the end of the scene, provided you get a chance to rest. Other consequences take longer.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
739
740
\end{itemize}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
741
\sectionruler{}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
742
743
744

\subsection{\\ What Is Stress?}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f36}

745
If you get hit and don't want to be taken out, you can choose to take stress.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
746

747
Stress represents you getting tired or annoyed, taking a superficial wound, or some other condition that goes away quickly.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
748

749
Your character sheet has a~stress track, a row of three boxes. When you take a hit and check a stress box, the box absorbs a number of shifts equal to its number: one shift for Box 1, two for Box 2, or three for Box 3.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
750

751
You can only check one stress box for any single hit, but you~can~check a stress box and take one or more consequences at the same time. You can't check a stress box that already has a check mark in it!
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
752
753
754

\subsection{What Are Consequences?}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f37}

755
756
757
758
Consequences are new aspects that you take to reflect being seriously hurt in some way. Your character sheet has three slots where you can write consequences. Each one is labeled with a number: 2 (mild consequence), 4 (moderate consequence), or 6 (severe consequence). This represents the number of shifts of the hit the consequence absorbs. You can mark off as many of these as you like to handle a single hit, but only if that slot was blank to start with. If you already have a moderate consequence written down, you can't take another one until you do something to make the first one go away!

A major downside of consequences is that each consequence is a new aspect that your opponents can invoke against you. The more you take, the more vulnerable you are. And just like situation aspects, the character that creates it (in this case, the character that hit you) gets one free invocation on that consequence. They can choose to let one of their allies use the free invocation.

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
759
\sectionruler{}
760
761

Let's say that you get hit really hard and take a 4-shift hit. You check Box 2 on your stress track, which leaves you with 2 shifts to deal with.  If you can't, you're taken out, so it's time for a consequence. You can choose to write a new aspect in the consequence slot labeled 2---say,~Sprained Ankle. Those final 2 shifts are taken care of and you
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
762
763
can keep fighting!

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
764
\sectionruler{}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
765

766
If you're unable to absorb all of a hit's shifts---by checking a stress box, taking consequences, or both---you're taken out.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
767

768
\subsection{What Happens When I Get Taken Out?}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f38}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
769

770
If you get taken out, you can no longer act in the scene. Whoever takes you out narrates what happens to you. It should make sense based on how you got taken out---maybe you run from the room in shame, or maybe you get knocked unconscious.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
771
772
773

\subsection{Giving In}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f39}

774
If things look grim for you, you can~give in~(or~concede~the fight)---but you have to say that's what you're going to do~before~your opponent rolls their dice.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
775

776
This is different than being taken out, because you get a say in what happens to you. Your opponent gets some major concession from you---talk about what makes sense in your situation---but it beats getting taken out and having no say at all.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
777

778
Additionally, you get one fate point for conceding, and one fate point for each consequence you took in this conflict. This is your chance to say, ``You win this round, but I'll get you next time!'' and get a tall stack of fate points to back it up.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
779

780
\subsection{Getting Better---Recovering from Stress and Consequences}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f40}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
781

782
At the end of each scene, clear all of your stress boxes. Recovery from a consequence is a bit more complicated; you need to explain how you recover from it---whether that's drinking a healing potion, taking a walk to calm down, or whatever makes sense with the consequence. You also need to wait an appropriate length of time.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
783
784
785
786

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
787
  Mild consequence:~Clear it at the end of the scene, provided you get a chance to rest.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
788
\item
789
  Moderate consequence:~Clear it at the end of the next session, provided it makes sense within the story.
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
790
\item
791
  Severe consequence:~Clear it at the end of the~\hyperref[scenario]{\emph{scenario}}, provided it makes sense
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
792
793
794
  within the story.
\end{itemize}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
795
\sectionruler{}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
796
797

\textbf{RENAMING MODERATE AND SEVERE CONSEQUENCES}
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
798

799
Moderate and severe consequences stick around for a while. Therefore, at some point you may want to change the name of the aspect to better fit what's going on in the story. For instance, after you get some medical help,~Painful Broken Leg~might make more sense if you change it to~Hobbling on Crutches.
800
\newpage
801
802
803
804
805
806
}

\renewcommand{\peppercarrotHeadlineAspects}{Aspects and Fate Points}
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotTocAspects}{Aspects and Fate Points}
\renewcommand{\peppercarrotTextAspects}{%

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
807
808
809
An~aspect~is a word or phrase that describes something special about a person, place, thing, situation, or group. Almost anything you can think of can have aspects. A person might be the~Greatest Swordswoman in Hereva. A room might be~On Fire~after you knock over an oil lamp.  After a time-travel encounter with a pre-historic phanda, you might be~Terrified.  Aspects let you change the story in ways that go along with your character's tendencies, skills, or problems.

% FIXME: Make a link here?
810

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
811
You~spend~fate points---which you keep track of with Fate Point tokens from Evil Hat Productions or glass beads or poker chips or some other tokens---to unlock the power of aspects and make them help you. You~earn~fate points by letting a character aspect be compelled against you to complicate the situation or make your life harder. Be sure to keep track of the fate points you have left at the end of the session---if you have~\hyperref[refresh]{more than your refresh}, you start the next session with the fate points you ended this session with.
812

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
813
\sectionruler{}
814

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
815
You earned a lot of fate points during your game session, ending the day with five fate points. Your refresh is 2, so you'll start with five fate points the next time you play. But another player ends the same session with just one fate point. His refresh is 3, so he'll begin the next session with 3 fate points, not just the one he had left over.
816

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
817
\sectionruler{}
818

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
819
\subsection{What Kinds of Aspects Are There?}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f42}
820

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
821
There's an endless variety of aspects, but no matter what they're called they all work pretty much the same way. The main difference is how long they stick around before going away.
822

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
823
Character Aspects:~These aspects are on your character sheet, such as your~\hyperref[Anchor-26]{high concept}~and~\hyperref[Anchor-27]{trouble}. They describe personality traits, important details about your past, relationships you have with others, important items or titles you possess, problems you're dealing with or goals you're working toward, or reputations and obligations you carry. These aspects only change under very unusual circumstances; most never will.
824

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
825
\sectionruler{}
826

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
827
Examples:~Captain of the Skyship Nimbus;~On the Run From the Witches of Chaosah;Attention to Detail;~I Must Protect My Brother
828

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
829
\sectionruler{}
830

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
831
Situation Aspects:~These aspects describe the surroundings that the action is taking place in. This includes aspects you create or discover using the~create an advantage~action. A situation aspect usually vanishes at the end of the scene it was part of, or when someone takes some action that would change or get rid of it. Essentially, they last only as long as the situational element they represent lasts.
832

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
833
\sectionruler{}
834

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
835
Examples:~On Fire;~Bright Sunlight;~Crowd of Angry People;~Knocked to the Ground
836

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
837
\sectionruler{}
838

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
839
To~get rid of a situation aspect, you can attempt an overcome action to eliminate it, provided you can think of a way your character could accomplish it---dump a bucket of water on the~Raging Fire, use evasive maneuvers to escape the enemy fighter that's~On Your Tail. An opponent may use a Defend action to try to preserve the aspect, if they can describe how they do it.
840

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
841
Consequences:~These aspects represent injuries or other lasting trauma that happen when you get hit by attacks.~\hyperref[Anchor-29]{They go away slowly}, as described in~Ouch! Damage, Stress, and Consequences.
842

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
843
\sectionruler{}
844

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
845
Examples:~Sprained Ankle;~Fear of Spiders;~Concussion;~Debilitating Self-Doubt
846

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
847
\sectionruler{}
848

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
849
Boosts:~A boost is a temporary aspect that you get to use once (see~``What Do You Do With Aspects?''next), then it vanishes. Unused boosts vanish when the scene they were created in is over or when the advantage they represent no longer exists. These represent very brief and fleeting advantages you get in conflicts with others.
850

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
851
\sectionruler{}
852
853
854

Examples:~In My Sights;~Distracted;~Unstable Footing;~Rock in His Boot

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
855
\sectionruler{}
856

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
857
\textbf{Player vs. Player (PVP)}\\
858

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
859
The only time that fate point might not go to the GM is when you're in conflict with another player. If you are, and you invoke one of that player's character aspects to help you out against them, they will get the fate point instead of the GM once the scene is over.
860

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
861
\sectionruler{}
862

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
863
\subsection{What Do You Do With Aspects?}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f43}
864

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
865
There are three big things you can do with aspects:~invoke~aspects,~compel~aspects, and use aspects to~establish facts.
866
867
868

\subsubsection{Invoking Aspects}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f44}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
869
You~invoke~an aspect to give yourself a bonus or make things a bit harder for your opponent. You can invoke any aspect that you a) know about, and b) can explain how you use it to your advantage---including aspects on other characters or on the situation. Normally, invoking an aspect costs you a fate point---hand one of your fate points to the GM.  To invoke an aspect, you need to describe how that aspect helps you in your current situation.
870

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
871
\sectionruler{}
872
873
874
875

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
876
  I attack the zombie with my sword. I know zombies are~Sluggish, so that should help me.
877
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
878
  I really want to scare this guy. I've heard he's~Scared of Mice, so I'll release a mouse in his bedroom.
879
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
880
  Now that the guard's~Distracted, I should be able to sneak right by him.
881
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
882
  This spell needs to be really powerful---I'm the~Head Teacher of Chaosah, so powerful spells are my bread and butter.
883
884
\end{itemize}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
885
\sectionruler{}
886

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
887
What does invoking the aspect get you? Choose one of the following effects:
888
889
890
891
892
893

\begin{itemize}
\itemsep1pt\parskip0pt\parsep0pt
\item
  Add a +2 bonus to your total. This costs a fate point.
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
894
  Reroll the dice. This option is best if you rolled really lousy (usually a −3 or −4 showing on the dice). This costs a fate point.
895
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
896
  Confront an opponent with the aspect. You use this option when your opponent is trying something and you think an existing aspect would make it harder for them. For instance, a thug wants to draw his dagger, but he's~Buried in Debris; you spend a fate point to invoke that aspect, and now your opponent's level of difficulty is increased by +2.
897
\item
Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
898
  Help an ally with the aspect. Use this option when a friend could use some help and you think an existing aspect would make it easier for them. You spend a fate point to invoke the aspect, and now your friend gets a +2 on their roll.
899
900
\end{itemize}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
901
Important:~You can only invoke any aspect once on a given dice roll; you can't spend a stack of fate points on one aspect and get a huge bonus from it. However, you~can~invoke several different aspects on the same roll.
902

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
903
904
If you're invoking an aspect to add a bonus or reroll your dice, wait until~after~you've rolled to do it. No sense spending a fate point if you don't need~to!

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
905
Free invocations:~\hyperref[succeed-with-style]{Sometimes you can invoke an aspect for free}, without paying a fate point. If you create or discover an aspect through the~create an advantage~action, the first invocation on it (by you or an ally) is free (if you succeeded with style, you get~two~freebies). If you cause a consequence through an attack, you or an ally can invoke it once for free.  A~\hyperref[Boosts]{\textbf{boost}}~is a special kind of aspect that grants one free invocation, then it vanishes.
906
907
908

\subsubsection{Compelling Aspects}\label{sigilux5ftocux5fidux5f45}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
909
If you're in a situation where having or being around a certain aspect means your character's life is more dramatic or complicated, anyone can~compel~the aspect. You can even compel it on yourself---that's called a self-compel. Compels are the most common way for players to earn more fate points.
910
911
912

There are two types of compels.

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
913
914
915
916
917
Decision compels:~This sort of compel suggests the answer to a decision your character has to make. If your character is~Queen Coriander, for example, you may need to stay to lead the defense of the City of Qualicity rather than fleeing to safety. Or if you have a~Defiant Streak a Mile Wide, maybe you can't help but mouth off to the Dean of Discipline when he questions you.

Event compels:~Other times a compel reflects something happening that makes life more complicated for you. If you have~Strange Luck, of course that spell you're working on in class accidentally turns the dour Potions Master's hair orange. If you~Owe Prince Acren a Favor, then Prince Acren's messenger shows up and demands that you perform a service for him just when it's least convenient.

In any case, when an aspect is compelled against you, the person compelling it offers you a fate point and suggests that the aspect has a certain effect---that you'll make a certain decision or that a particular event will occur. You can discuss it back and forth, proposing tweaks or changes to the suggested compel. After a moment or two, you need to decide whether to accept the compel. If you agree, you take the fate point and your character makes the suggested decision or the event happens. If you refuse, you must~pay~a fate point from your own supply. Yes, this means that if you don't have any fate points, you can't refuse a compel!
918

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
919
\sectionruler{}
920
921
922

\textbf{How Many Fate Points Does the GM Get?}

Craig Maloney's avatar
Craig Maloney committed
923
As GM, you don't need to track fate points for each NPC, but that doesn't mean you get an unlimited number. Start each scene with a pool of one fate point per PC that's in the scene. Spend fate points from this pool to invoke aspects (and consequences) against the PCs. When it's empty, you can't invoke aspects against them.
924