Commit e6902816 authored by Olivier's avatar Olivier

Chapter 2: added slides for YouTube videos

parent f66e01b3
\documentclass[17pt]{beamer}
\usepackage{fluidmechslides} % from https://framagit.org/olivier/sensible-styles
% Syntax for single-image slides:
% (the first argument (number) being the maximum fraction of the
% slide width that the image is allowed to have.)
% \figureframe{1}{filename}{Title}{Attribution}
% Do I want the print version? (no \pause, larger preamble)
\printversion
\begin{document}
\begin{frame}{Rho vee aaaah}
\begin{mdframed}
\begin{IEEEeqnarray*}{rCl}
0 & = & \Sigma \left[\rho V_\perp A \right]_\text{incoming} + \Sigma \left[\rho V_\perp A \right]_\text{outgoing} \nonumber\label{eq_mass_oned}
\end{IEEEeqnarray*}
\small
For steady flow through a fixed volume.
\end{mdframed}
\end{frame}
\begin{frame}{Danger}
\begin{center}
\begin{IEEEeqnarray*}{rCl}
\left(\rho |V_\perp| A \right)_1 &=& \left(\rho |V_\perp| A \right)_2 \label{eq_rho_vee_a}
\end{IEEEeqnarray*}
“if $A$ increases, then $V$ must decrease”\pause
\textit{oder?}
\end{center}
\end{frame}
\pictureframe{1}{F-4B_VF-74_taking_off_1961.jpg}{}{\wcfile{F-4B_VF-74_taking_off_1961.jpg}{Photo} US Navy (1961, \pd)}
\pictureframe{0.99}{F-4E_Phantom_-_RIAT_2016_(27746406413).jpg}{}{\wcfile{F-4E_Phantom_-_RIAT_2016_(27746406413).jpg}{Photo} \ccbysa by \flickrname{24874528@N04}{Airwolfhound}}
\pictureframe{1}{NASA_83-0502_with_UAVSAR_at_Edwards_AFB_(ED07-0042-09).jpg}{}{\wcfile{NASA_83-0502_with_UAVSAR_at_Edwards_AFB_(ED07-0042-09).jpg}{Photo} by Lori Losey / NASA (\pd, 2007)}
\pictureframe{1}{RR_Spey.jpg}{Rolls-Royce Spey}{\wcfile{RR_Spey.jpg}{Photo} \ccbysa Arjun Sarup}
\begin{frame}{Possibly Wrong Fluid Mech}
\begin{enumerate}
\item only true if $\rho$ remains constant.\\\pause
OK for water flows. No heat transfer, no expansion!\pause
Supersonic flow: $A\searrow$ can lead to $V\searrow$ because $\rho \nearrow$.
\end{enumerate}
\end{frame}
\pictureframe{1}{9393569695_a8ce57f1c8_o}{Smaller A, larger V?}{\flickrfile{aboutamy/9393569695/}{Photo} \ccby by \flickrname{aboutamy}{Amy Stanley}}
\begin{frame}{Possibly Wrong Fluid Mech}
\begin{enumerate}
\shift{1}
\item There is no causal relationship. \\\pause
$A_2\searrow$ may mean $V_2\nearrow$, but…\pause
nothing guarantees $A_2 V_2$ remains constant!\pause ~(maybe $\dot m\searrow$).\pause
Increases in velocity are not “for free”: they require force be applied and energy be spent.
\end{enumerate}
\end{frame}
\begin{frame}
Are you using the mass balance equation to predict velocity?\pause
$\to$ also ask yourself: what force, what power required?
\end{frame}
\end{document}
\documentclass[17pt]{beamer}
\usepackage{fluidmechslides} % from https://framagit.org/olivier/sensible-styles
% Syntax for single-image slides:
% (the first argument (number) being the maximum fraction of the
% slide width that the image is allowed to have.)
% \figureframe{1}{filename}{Title}{Attribution}
% Do I want the print version? (no \pause, larger preamble)
\printversion
\begin{document}
\begin{frame}{Rho vee aaaah veeee}
\begin{mdframed}
\begin{IEEEeqnarray*}{rCl}
\vec F_\text{net on fluid} & = & \Sigma \left[\rho V_\perp A \vec V\right]_\text{incoming} \nonumber\\
&& + \Sigma \left[\rho V_\perp A \vec V\right]_\text{outgoing}\label{eq_linearmom_oned}
\end{IEEEeqnarray*}
{\small
For steady flow through a fixed volume,\\
where $V_\perp$ is negative inwards, positive outwards.
}
\end{mdframed}
\end{frame}
\begin{frame}
Example with one inlet and one outlet:
\begin{IEEEeqnarray*}{rCCCCCCCC}
\vec F_\net & = & \left(\rho V_\perp A \vec V\right)_\inn &+& \left(\rho V_\perp A \vec V \right)_\out\\\pause
\vec F_\net & = & -\left(\rho |V_\perp| A \vec V \right)_\inn &+& \left(\rho |V_\perp| A \vec V \right)_\out
\end{IEEEeqnarray*}
\end{frame}
\begin{frame}
Example with one inlet and one outlet:
\begin{IEEEeqnarray*}{rCl}
\vec F_\net & = & |\dot m| \left(\vec V_2 - \vec V_1 \right)\label{eq_fnet_twovectors}
\end{IEEEeqnarray*}
\end{frame}
\begin{frame}
There are \emph{two} reasons why $\vec F_\net \neq \vec 0$:\pause
\begin{itemize}
\item $\vec V_2$ longer or shorter than $\vec V_1$\pause
\item $\vec V_2$ has different direction than $\vec V_1$
\end{itemize}
\end{frame}
\pictureframe{1}{jet0}{}{\wcfile{US Navy 110723-N-SD300-026 Damage Controlman Fireman Michael Rodriguez, right, instructs Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Bobby Bayron on p.jpg}{Photo} by James Norman, U.S. Navy (\pd)}
\pictureframe{1}{130501-N-ER662-124}{}{\wcfile{U.S. Navy Chief Master-at-Arms Marlon Thomas, foreground, practices hose handling techniques during firefighting training aboard the guided missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) in the Arabian Sea May 1, 2013 130501-N-ER662-124.jpg}{Photo} by Matthew Cole, U.S. Navy (\pd)}
\pictureframe{1}{130828-N-ZZ999-013}{V2 longer than V1}{\wcfile{Sailors practice firefighting in Timor-Leste. (9623221318).jpg}{Photo} by Jon Marzullo, U.S. Navy (\pd)}
\figureframe{0.7}{twodeltavs_1a}{}{Figure \cczero \oc}
\figureframe{1}{twodeltavs_1b}{}{Figure \cczero \oc}
\figureframe{0.7}{twodeltavs_1c}{}{Figure \cczero \oc}
\figureframe{1}{f1352}{$\vec V_2$ different direction than $\vec V_1$}{\wcfile{Jet engine F135(STOVL variant)'s thrust vectoring nozzle N.PNG}{Figure} \ccbysa by U:Tosaka}
\figureframe{0.8}{twodeltavs_2a}{}{Figure \cczero \oc}
\figureframe{1}{twodeltavs_2b}{}{Figure \cczero \oc}
\figureframe{0.8}{twodeltavs_2c}{}{Figure \cczero \oc}
\end{document}
This diff is collapsed.
Markdown is supported
0%
or
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment