Commit c400a307 authored by Olivier's avatar Olivier
Browse files

New title, new license (CC-BY-NC), new syllabus for 2020

parent 9cd15c3c
......@@ -17,116 +17,160 @@
\clearpage
\phantomsection
\addcontentsline{toc}{chapter}{Syllabus}
\addcontentsline{toc}{chapter}{About this course (syllabus)}
\defaultfooter
\begin{center}
{\LARGE Syllabus}\par
{\LARGE About this course (syllabus)}\par
Fluid Mechanics for Master Students\\
Fluid dynamics for engineers by Olivier Cleynen\\
\href{https://fluidmech.ninja/}{https://fluidmech.ninja/}\\
Summer semester 2019\\
Olivier Cleynen
Summer semester 2020
\vspace{0em}
\end{center}
Welcome to the Fluid Mechanics course of the \textit{Chemical and Energy Engineering} program!
Welcome to the Fluid Dynamics course of the \textit{Chemical and Energy Engineering} program! My name is Olivier Cleynen and I will be your teacher for this semester.
\section*{Objectives}
This one-semester course is designed for students working towards a Master in engineering, who have had little or no previous experience with fluid dynamics. My objectives are simultaneously:
Starting with little or no experience with fluid mechanics, after taking this course:
\begin{itemize}
\item to provide you with a solid understanding of what can, an cannot, be done with fluid mechanics in engineering;
\item to enable you to solve selected engineering fluid dynamics problems with confidence;
\item to request the minimum feasible amount of your time and energy for the above.
\item you should have a good understanding of what can, an cannot, be calculated with fluid mechanics in engineering: how we approach problems depending on how much information is available.
\item you should be able to solve several real-world engineering fluid mechanics problems with confidence: calculating forces within fluids and on objects, predicting flow in pipes, near walls, at small and large scales.
\end{itemize}
My objective is to enable you to get there with the minimum amount of your time and energy (but not minimum power!).
If all goes well, at the end of the semester, you should be well-prepared to begin a course in \vocab{Computational Fluid Dynamics}, where the knowledge and skills you acquire here can be used to solve applied problems in great detail.
\section*{Course homepage}
The course homepage is located at a hard-to-unremember location:
\section*{This is an online course}
\begin{centering}\href{https://fluidmech.ninja/}{https://fluidmech.ninja/}\par\end{centering}
From that page, you can download the latest version of the present document, as well as lecture slides and archived examinations.
This course is run entirely online. I will release one chapter per week (one large \pdf document with theory, problems, and videos). We will go together through weekly quizzes, graded homework programs, and a final exam.
This course script is the only document you need to work through and succeed in this course. I highly recommend that you print it out (at 200 pages, a copy at the University print shop costs less than 9\ €). If you can’t afford this, print at least the exercise sheets and the first page of each chapter.
I am new to online learning and teaching, as perhaps you are too. As I write these lines, we are in the middle of a global pandemic. I hope you and your loved ones are safe, and that taking part in this course enables you to remain so. I am convinced that online fluid dynamics can be a lot of fun — I’ll do my very best for this!
Note that this year, one chapter is missing. I will complete the all-new \chapternine a few weeks after the course has started.
In order to receive weekly updates about the course, send an email to fluidmech@ovgu.de from your university email account, indicating your name and matriculation number.
We will have several venues to communicate:
\begin{itemize}
\item I write an email to every student every week, to announce course events;
\item The course’s Moodle page at \href{https://elearning.ovgu.de/course/view.php?id=7199}{https://elearning.ovgu.de/course/view.php?id=7199} is used for weekly quizzes and forum discussions;
\itme The course’s homepage at \href{https://fluidmech.ninja/}{https://fluidmech.ninja/} contains the course material, released every week;
\item I am available for questions and answers every Friday on Zoom (room 959-0526-7229, password released through the Moodle page)
\end{itemize}
\section*{Lectures}
\section*{About Olivier and colleagues}
We will have lectures on Thursdays from 11:15 to 12:45 in room G03-214. In class, we will cover a lot of content, at a rather brisk pace. The most efficient way to proceed is to read the notes before the lecture. Try doing that: even a brief skim over the relevant chapter helps. We will also experiment with new tools: if you have one at hand, try bringing an Internet-connected device with you.
\begin{wrapfigure}[7]{R}[0pt]{0.4\textwidth}\vspace{-\intextsep}\includegraphics[width=0.4\textwidth]{olivier}\vspace{-\intextsep}\end{wrapfigure}
Hello! I am a PhD student here at the University Otto von Guericke of Magdeburg. Most of my work consists in calculating the performance of low-impact hydropower machines using computers. I obtained my Master’s in 2006, then went on to found and work for a non-profit organization, and then became a university teacher in France. I arrived in Magdeburg in 2015, and currently live here with my partner and her ten year-old child. It’s a pleasure and a privilege to be here!
I am delivering this course on behalf of prof.\ Thévenin and the \href{http://www.lss.ovgu.de/}{fluid dynamics laboratory} (\textsc{isut-lss}) of the university. This year, I am lucky to be assisted by two former students of the course, Jochen König and Arjun Neyyathala.
\section*{Exercise sessions}
\section*{Assessment}
\label{ch_assessment}
Exercise sessions take place on Fridays in room G03-214. The schedule is slightly more complicated:
\begin{itemize}
\item For first-semester students, on odd weeks, from 13:00 to 15:00, and on even weeks, from 15:00 to 17:00;
\item For second (or later) semester students, just the opposite: on even weeks, from 13:00 to 15:00, and on odd weeks, from 15:00 to 17:00.
\end{itemize}
I am available during those sessions to help you work through the exercises, and will strive to answer all of your questions. The objective should be for you to work as fast as possible in order to cover each sheet entirely; attempting the first exercises on the prior day helps greatly in this respect. Although I occasionally use the board and projector, these sessions are hands-on and you should expect to work autonomously, alone or in groups. Bring your own exercise sheets, a calculator, a sugary drink, and start right away!
I know that assessment is important to you, and I take it very seriously. I strive to make the grading fair, motivating, and aligned with the course objectives. Your grade at the end of the semester will be determined according to the following components:
\begin{description}
\item[Weekly quizzes (10\%)] Every time a chapter is released, you are requested to answer low-level questions about its content, through the Moodle course page. You can take the quiz at your convenience, within one week of the chapter release. The quiz is time-limited to one hour; you must take it alone, and you can use all the documentation you wish. The average grade resulting from all your quizzes will count \SI{10}{\percent} towards your final grade.
\item[Homework (50\%)] Four times during the semester, you will receive one unique assignment by email; you will have one week to submit your answer. Once you do, you will be expected to grade anonymized assignments from two other students, with the help of a worked-out answer sheet. Your own work will be graded anonymously by two other students.\\
This homework program was developed in collaboration with former student Germán Santa-Maria in 2019.~\cite{cleynenetal2020peergraded} The average grade resulting from your four homework answers will count \SI{50}{\percent} towards your final grade.
\item[Final exam (40\%)] At the end of the semester, we will have a two-hour, closed-book examination (a formula sheet is provided, containing the formulas and data contained in the preamble of every problem sheet). The examination consists exclusively of lightly-modified exercise sheet problems. As reported by students in the previous years, “the exam is very hard if you haven’t done the exercises, and very easy if you have done them”.\\
The examination from 2019 is presented in Appendix~\ref{ch_previous_exam} p.~\pageref{ch_previous_exam}, with its full solution. I encourage you to take a look through it, to see how it is built. Compared to former years, two things will change this year:
\begin{enumerate}
\item The examination content will be shorter (this is possible because the homework has increased);
\item The examination itself might be shifted from July to September 2020; it may also be canceled entirely, because of the pandemic crisis.
\end{enumerate}
I will email you with full details as soon as I know more about the exam. Before the semester ends, I will give you an extended briefing about the examination, including a complete list of examinable problems, and instructions for how to score well. It is frustrating for all of us not to know everything about the examination yet. I hope you will be patient with me in those trying times.
\end{description}
You can miss one homework assignment and one quiz during the semester without penalty, no questions asked. Life happens. I too have a life outside of fluid dynamics~(!) and I will certainly goof up a least once during the semester. If you need more accommodations, you should absolutely contact me.
\textbf{For additional credit}, optionally, you can help expand the video content of this course. I would love to see students making a 5- to 10-minute video about a specific aspect of a chapter, to complement my coverage. I would also welcome the addition of useful figures, conceptual maps, doodles, comics, diagrams etc.\ to the course script. Please contact me if interested.
\section*{Accessibility}
I have little experience with accessibility, but I think about it a lot~\cite{cleynen2020accessibility}. I provide closed captions (subtitles) for all the videos embedded in the course notes. I do not know what else may be helpful. If you have difficulties accessing the audio, video, or text in this course, let me know what I can do to help.
\section*{End-of-semester examination}
The end-of-semester examination will take place on July 11\up{th}, from 15:30 to 17:30 in room G26-H1. This examination is the main assessment for the course. It lasts exactly 2~hours and is closed-book (a formula sheet is provided, containing the formulas and data contained in the preamble of every problem sheet). A briefing regarding the examination will take place in class immediately after we cover Chapter~7, on May~23\up{rd}.
\section*{What you need for this course}
The examination consists exclusively of lightly-modified exercise sheet problems. As reported by students in the previous years, “the exam is very hard if you haven’t done the exercises, and very easy if you have done them”. It rewards your ability to methodically, resolutely and reliably solve the problems studied in class. To succeed, make sure you can solve all of them without outside help! A handful of archived examinations, together with their full solutions, is provided on the course homepage to help you practice.
\begin{description}
\item[Bandwidth] A stable internet connection. There are many YouTube videos embedded in the course script, and reliable bandwidth helps with talking to me on Zoom, too.
\item[A laptop] I understand you love your smartphone, but it’s much harder to take notes and do homework on it. If you need to purchase good-quality equipment on a budget, \href{https://ariadacapo.net/blog/2020-02-02-students-guide-to-buying-a-laptop-in-europe/}{here’s a guide I co-authored with my colleague Samuel Voß}~\cite{cleynenvoss2020laptop}.
\item[A Zoom client] To participate in Q\&A on Fridays with me, you need the Zoom app installed on your favorite device, and to connect with your university account.
\item[A book?] \emph{You do not need books for this course}. The eleven chapters of the course script, together, are all you need to work and succeed through the entire course.\\
If, nevertheless, you feel more comfortable working with a book, I recommend those of Crowe~et~al.~\cite{croweetal2001}, White~\cite{white2008}, Çengel et~al.~\cite{cengelcimbala2010}, Munson et~al.~\cite{munsonetal2013}, or (my favorite) de~Nevers~\cite{denevers2004}. All of them are solid, beautifully-illustrated, well-established textbooks, with plenty of worked-out problems. You will see that this course matches closely their content and style.
\item[Self-discipline] The hardest part of learning online is that there is no social pressure to keep you going. I strongly recommend you assign a fixed weekly time schedule to work on this course, and communicate with peers and with me in the Moodle course page, to stay in the loop.
\end{description}
\section*{Peer-graded coursework}
\section*{Names}
You can take part in a peer-graded coursework program during the semester, if you would like. Three times during the semester, one unique assignment will be handed to you; you will have one week to submit your answer. Once you do, you will be expected to grade anonymized assignments from two other students, with the help of a worked-out answer sheet. Your own work will be graded anonymously by two other students.
In the end, the coursework assignments will count \SI{20}{\percent} towards your final mark, with the exam making up the other \SI{80}{\percent}. Participation in the coursework program is optional. If you do not participate, the exam will make up \SI{100}{\percent} of your final mark for this course.
By default, I will address you using the first name and gender given in your university record. If you wish to change that, I will be happy to use your preferred name and pronouns: just let me know.
The peer-graded coursework program will be run entirely by email. In order to receive an invitation to participate, send an email to fluidmech@ovgu.de from your university email account, indicating your name and matriculation number.
I like to be addressed as just “Olivier” (pronouns: he/him/his). You can use my last name if that makes you more comfortable. Note that I am neither a professor nor (yet) a doctor~:-)
\section*{Books}
\section*{Contact}
You can join me on Zoom on Fridays from 13:00 to 15:00, in room 959-0526-7229 (password released through the Moodle page).
My email is olivier.cleynen@ovgu.de. I strive to answer all requests within 48 hours. However, I am alone facing emails from 110 students, so if you need help with problems, the Moodle forum pages might be a better place to start (I check those out every weekday, and other students can help you there too). I am always willing to receive feedback about the course, and hear about technical and human problems, so don’t hesitate to get in touch.
The present document is, I hope, enough to allow you to work and succeed through the entire course. If you need a second source, I recommend the books of Crowe~et~al.~\cite{croweetal2001} (particularly since a dozen copies are available in our library), White~\cite{white2008}, Çengel et~al.~\cite{cengelcimbala2010}, Munson et~al.~\cite{munsonetal2013}, or (my favorite) de~Nevers~\cite{denevers2004}. All of them are solid, beautifully-illustrated, well-established textbooks, with plenty of worked-out exercises. You will see that this course matches closely their content and style.
\section*{Time plan}
Our time plan, taking into account the holidays in Saxony-Anhalt, should be as follows:
\TabPositions{1.8cm, 11cm}
Week 14: \chapterone\\
Week 15: \chaptertwo\\
Week 16: \chapterthree, \textcolor{vocabcolor}{No exercise session}\\
Week 17: \chapterthree\\
Week 18: \chapterfour \\
Week 19: \chapterfive\\
Week 20: \chaptersix\\
Week 21: \chapterseven, \textcolor{vocabcolor}{Exam briefing}\\
Week 22: \textcolor{vocabcolor}{No lecture}\\
Week 23: \chaptereight\\
Week 24: \chapternine\\
Week 25: \chapterten, \textcolor{vocabcolor}{Feedback}\\
Week 26: \chaptereleven\\
Week 27: revision \& practice\\
Week 28: Examination: July 11\up{th} (15:30-17:30 in room G26-H1)
Our time plan should be as follows:
April 23: \tab \chapterone\\
April 30: \tab \chaptertwo, \tab \textcolor{vocabcolor}{Homework \#1 begins}\\
May 7: \tab \chapterthree, \tab \textcolor{vocabcolor}{Homework \#1 due}\\
May 14: \tab \chapterthree\\
May 21: \tab \chapterfour, \tab \textcolor{vocabcolor}{Homework \#2 begins}\\
May 28: \tab \chapterfive, \tab \textcolor{vocabcolor}{Homework \#2 due}\\
June 4: \tab \chaptersix\\
June 11: \tab \chapterseven, \tab \textcolor{vocabcolor}{Homework \#3 begins}\\
June 18: \tab \chaptereight, \tab \textcolor{vocabcolor}{Homework \#3 due}\\
June 25: \tab \chapternine, \tab \textcolor{vocabcolor}{Homework \#4 begins}\\
July 2: \tab \chapterten, \tab \textcolor{vocabcolor}{Homework \#4 due}\\
July 9: \tab \chaptereleven\\
July to September: Final Examination (date to be determined)
\section*{Copyright and remixing}
\TabPositions{6cm} % default
This document still contains several figures from cited, fully-copyrighted works. The source files for all of the remaining figures (which stem from many different authors, not all associated with this course) can be accessed and re-used by clicking the links in the captions. The text of this document is licensed under a Creative Commons \ccbysa (attribution, share-alike) license. The Latex sources can be downloaded from the git repository accessed from the course homepage. I am grateful for receiving all types of feedback, including reports of inaccuracies and errors.
\section*{Contact}
\section*{Copyright, remixing, and authors}
This document is mainly authored by Olivier Cleynen. Substantial contributions have been made by colleagues Germán Santa-Maria, Jochen König, and Arjun Neyyathala. Numerous improvements have been contributed by students over the years.\\
Many figures from authors not associated with this course are included; the author, license, and a link to the source are indicated every time. A few figures still remain which are extracted from cited, fully-copyrighted works, as indicated.\\
Most portrait illustrations are authored by Oksana Grivina; they are fully-copyrighted and used under a commercial license in this project. Other portrait illustrations are authored by Agustin Dede Prasetyo and Olivier Cleynen under a \ccby license.
The text of this document is licensed under a Creative Commons \ccbync (attribution, non-commercial) license. The Latex sources can be downloaded from the git repository accessed from the course homepage.~\cite{cleynen2020fluidmechgit}
If you use this document in other works, please cite it as “Olivier Cleynen. \textit{Fluid dynamics for engineers}. Under \ccbync license. 2020. \textsc{url}: \href{https://fluidmech.ninja/}{\textcolor{black}{https://fluidmech.ninja}}”.
\section*{Conclusion}
\begin{center}
\href{https://youtu.be/NJfiIGOADK0}{\includegraphics[width=0.6\textwidth]{welcome_video}}
\textit{\href{https://youtu.be/NJfiIGOADK0}{Welcome to this course! (a YouTube video)}}\par
\end{center}
I can always be reached by email (olivier.cleynen@ovgu.de). It is far more efficient to ask questions during exercise sessions. If you cannot make it there or for urgent matters, contact me directly by email (please be precise and succinct) or come Friday mornings at my office G14-111.
It’s a pleasure to join you for this course this semester! Fluid mechanics is one of the most exciting disciplines out there. Now, let us begin!
\begin{flushright}
Olivier Cleynen\\
April 2019
April 2020
\end{flushright}
\restoregeometry\restoredefaultfootoffset\cleardoublepage
......@@ -7,7 +7,7 @@
\begin{center}
\rule{15cm}{.1pt}\par
\vspace{1em}
{\LARGE Fluid Mechanics for Master Students}\par
{\LARGE Fluid Dynamics for Engineers}\par
\vspace{0.2em}\par
\rule{15cm}{.1pt}\par
......
Fluid Mechanics
===============
Fluid Dynamics
==============
The lecture notes and exercise sheets of a one-semester course in fluid mechanics, designed for students of the Chemical Energy and Engineering program at the Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg.
......@@ -13,7 +13,7 @@ Main author: <a href="https://ariadacapo.net/">Olivier Cleynen</a>, based on the
## License
The text of the lecture notes is licensed under a <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en">Creative Commons BY-SA</a> license.
The text of the lecture notes is licensed under a <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/deed.en">Creative Commons BY-NC</a> license.
Figures used in this document are sometimes quoted from fully-copyrighed works and may not be re-licensable. Other figures are published under free licenses, from authors not associated with this work. The copyright license of each figure is indicated next to its caption.
......
Markdown is supported
0% or .
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment