Commit 4c982b96 authored by Olivier's avatar Olivier

Chapter 1: fix description of terms of eqs 1/19-21

With thanks to Saksham Verma for reporting the issue
parent 5e275b9d
\renewcommand{\lastedityear}{2020}
\renewcommand{\lasteditmonth}{04}
\renewcommand{\lasteditday}{17}
\renewcommand{\lasteditday}{26}
\renewcommand{\numberofthischapter}{1}
\renewcommand{\titleofthischapter}{\namechapterone}
......@@ -227,7 +227,7 @@
\begin{equation}
\ma \equiv \frac{V}{c} \label{eq_def_ma}
\end{equation}
Since both~$V$ and~$c$ can be functions of space in a given flow, $\ma$ may not be uniform (\eg\ the Mach number around an aircraft in flight is different at the nose and above its wings). Nevertheless, a single value is typically chosen to identify “the” representative Mach number of any given flow.
Since both~$V$ and~$c$ can be functions of space in a given flow, $\ma$ may not be uniform (\eg the Mach number around an aircraft in flight is different at the nose and above its wings). Nevertheless, a single value is typically chosen to identify “the” representative Mach number of any given flow.
%⪅
It is observed that providing no heat or work transfer occurs, when fluids flow at $\ma\leq\num{0,3}$, their density $\rho$ stays constant. Density variations in practice can be safely neglected below $\ma=\num{0,6}$. When the density is uniform, the flow is said to be \vocab{incompressible}. Above these Mach numbers, it is observed that when subjected to pressure variations, fluids exert work upon themselves, which translates into measurable density and temperature changes: these are called \vocab{compressibility effects}, and we will not study them in this course.
......@@ -373,8 +373,8 @@
&=& \frac{\dot m}{\rho} \ p
\end{IEEEeqnarray}
\begin{equationterms}
\item where \tab $\dot W$ \tab is the power spent as work (\si{\watt});
\item and \tab $p$ \tab\tab is the mean pressure at the surface (\si{\pascal}).
\item where \tab $\dot P_\text{pressure}$ is the power required to cross the surface (\si{\watt});
\item and \tab $p$ is the mean pressure at the surface (\si{\pascal}).
\end{equationterms}
If a fluid passes across a \textit{volume}, the net power $\dot P_\text{pressure, net}$ required to both enter and leave the volume may be expressed as
\eq{
......
Markdown is supported
0%
or
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment