README 20.4 KB
Newer Older
1
Smarty 3.x
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122

Author: Monte Ohrt <monte at ohrt dot com >
Author: Uwe Tews

AN INTRODUCTION TO SMARTY 3

NOTICE FOR 3.1 release:

Please see the SMARTY_3.1_NOTES.txt file that comes with the distribution.

NOTICE for 3.0.5 release:

Smarty now follows the PHP error_reporting level by default. If PHP does not mask E_NOTICE and you try to access an unset template variable, you will now get an E_NOTICE warning. To revert to the old behavior:

$smarty->error_reporting = E_ALL & ~E_NOTICE;

NOTICE for 3.0 release:

IMPORTANT: Some API adjustments have been made between the RC4 and 3.0 release.
We felt it is better to make these now instead of after a 3.0 release, then have to
immediately deprecate APIs in 3.1. Online documentation has been updated
to reflect these changes. Specifically:

---- API CHANGES RC4 -> 3.0 ----

$smarty->register->*
$smarty->unregister->*
$smarty->utility->*
$samrty->cache->*

Have all been changed to local method calls such as:

$smarty->clearAllCache()
$smarty->registerFoo()
$smarty->unregisterFoo()
$smarty->testInstall()
etc.

Registration of function, block, compiler, and modifier plugins have been
consolidated under two API calls:

$smarty->registerPlugin(...)
$smarty->unregisterPlugin(...)

Registration of pre, post, output and variable filters have been
consolidated under two API calls:

$smarty->registerFilter(...)
$smarty->unregisterFilter(...)

Please refer to the online documentation for all specific changes:

http://www.smarty.net/documentation

----

The Smarty 3 API has been refactored to a syntax geared
for consistency and modularity. The Smarty 2 API syntax is still supported, but
will throw a deprecation notice. You can disable the notices, but it is highly
recommended to adjust your syntax to Smarty 3, as the Smarty 2 syntax must run
through an extra rerouting wrapper.

Basically, all Smarty methods now follow the "fooBarBaz" camel case syntax. Also,
all Smarty properties now have getters and setters. So for example, the property
$smarty->cache_dir can be set with $smarty->setCacheDir('foo/') and can be
retrieved with $smarty->getCacheDir().

Some of the Smarty 3 APIs have been revoked such as the "is*" methods that were
just duplicate functions of the now available "get*" methods.

Here is a rundown of the Smarty 3 API:

$smarty->fetch($template, $cache_id = null, $compile_id = null, $parent = null)
$smarty->display($template, $cache_id = null, $compile_id = null, $parent = null)
$smarty->isCached($template, $cache_id = null, $compile_id = null)
$smarty->createData($parent = null)
$smarty->createTemplate($template, $cache_id = null, $compile_id = null, $parent = null)
$smarty->enableSecurity()
$smarty->disableSecurity()
$smarty->setTemplateDir($template_dir)
$smarty->addTemplateDir($template_dir)
$smarty->templateExists($resource_name)
$smarty->loadPlugin($plugin_name, $check = true)
$smarty->loadFilter($type, $name)
$smarty->setExceptionHandler($handler)
$smarty->addPluginsDir($plugins_dir)
$smarty->getGlobal($varname = null)
$smarty->getRegisteredObject($name)
$smarty->getDebugTemplate()
$smarty->setDebugTemplate($tpl_name)
$smarty->assign($tpl_var, $value = null, $nocache = false)
$smarty->assignGlobal($varname, $value = null, $nocache = false)
$smarty->assignByRef($tpl_var, &$value, $nocache = false)
$smarty->append($tpl_var, $value = null, $merge = false, $nocache = false)
$smarty->appendByRef($tpl_var, &$value, $merge = false)
$smarty->clearAssign($tpl_var)
$smarty->clearAllAssign()
$smarty->configLoad($config_file, $sections = null)
$smarty->getVariable($variable, $_ptr = null, $search_parents = true, $error_enable = true)
$smarty->getConfigVariable($variable)
$smarty->getStreamVariable($variable)
$smarty->getConfigVars($varname = null)
$smarty->clearConfig($varname = null)
$smarty->getTemplateVars($varname = null, $_ptr = null, $search_parents = true)
$smarty->clearAllCache($exp_time = null, $type = null)
$smarty->clearCache($template_name, $cache_id = null, $compile_id = null, $exp_time = null, $type = null)

$smarty->registerPlugin($type, $tag, $callback, $cacheable = true, $cache_attr = array())

$smarty->registerObject($object_name, $object_impl, $allowed = array(), $smarty_args = true, $block_methods = array())

$smarty->registerFilter($type, $function_name)
$smarty->registerResource($resource_type, $function_names)
$smarty->registerDefaultPluginHandler($function_name)
$smarty->registerDefaultTemplateHandler($function_name)

$smarty->unregisterPlugin($type, $tag)
$smarty->unregisterObject($object_name)
$smarty->unregisterFilter($type, $function_name)
$smarty->unregisterResource($resource_type)

Thomas Willingham's avatar
Thomas Willingham committed
123
$smarty->compileAllTemplates($extension = '.tpl', $force_compile = false, $time_limit = 0, $max_errors = null)
124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462
$smarty->clearCompiledTemplate($resource_name = null, $compile_id = null, $exp_time = null)
$smarty->testInstall()

// then all the getters/setters, available for all properties. Here are a few:

$caching = $smarty->getCaching();      // get $smarty->caching
$smarty->setCaching(true);             // set $smarty->caching
$smarty->setDeprecationNotices(false); // set $smarty->deprecation_notices
$smarty->setCacheId($id);              // set $smarty->cache_id
$debugging = $smarty->getDebugging();  // get $smarty->debugging


FILE STRUCTURE

The Smarty 3 file structure is similar to Smarty 2:

/libs/
  Smarty.class.php
/libs/sysplugins/
  internal.*
/libs/plugins/
  function.mailto.php
  modifier.escape.php
  ...

A lot of Smarty 3 core functionality lies in the sysplugins directory; you do
not need to change any files here. The /libs/plugins/ folder is where Smarty
plugins are located. You can add your own here, or create a separate plugin
directory, just the same as Smarty 2. You will still need to create your own
/cache/, /templates/, /templates_c/, /configs/ folders. Be sure /cache/ and
/templates_c/ are writable.

The typical way to use Smarty 3 should also look familiar:

require('Smarty.class.php');
$smarty = new Smarty;
$smarty->assign('foo','bar');
$smarty->display('index.tpl');


However, Smarty 3 works completely different on the inside. Smarty 3 is mostly
backward compatible with Smarty 2, except for the following items:

*) Smarty 3 is PHP 5 only. It will not work with PHP 4.
*) The {php} tag is disabled by default. Enable with $smarty->allow_php_tag=true.
*) Delimiters surrounded by whitespace are no longer treated as Smarty tags.
   Therefore, { foo } will not compile as a tag, you must use {foo}. This change
   Makes Javascript/CSS easier to work with, eliminating the need for {literal}.
   This can be disabled by setting $smarty->auto_literal = false;
*) The Smarty 3 API is a bit different. Many Smarty 2 API calls are deprecated
   but still work. You will want to update your calls to Smarty 3 for maximum
   efficiency.


There are many things that are new to Smarty 3. Here are the notable items:
   
LEXER/PARSER
============

Smarty 3 now uses a lexing tokenizer for its parser/compiler. Basically, this
means Smarty has some syntax additions that make life easier such as in-template
math, shorter/intuitive function parameter options, infinite function recursion,
more accurate error handling, etc.


WHAT IS NEW IN SMARTY TEMPLATE SYNTAX
=====================================

Smarty 3 allows expressions almost anywhere. Expressions can include PHP
functions as long as they are not disabled by the security policy, object
methods and properties, etc. The {math} plugin is no longer necessary but
is still supported for BC.

Examples:
{$x+$y}                           will output the sum of x and y.
{$foo = strlen($bar)}             function in assignment
{assign var=foo value= $x+$y}     in attributes 
{$foo = myfunct( ($x+$y)*3 )}     as function parameter 
{$foo[$x+3]}                      as array index

Smarty tags can be used as values within other tags.
Example:  {$foo={counter}+3}

Smarty tags can also be used inside double quoted strings.
Example:  {$foo="this is message {counter}"}

You can define arrays within templates.
Examples:
{assign var=foo value=[1,2,3]}
{assign var=foo value=['y'=>'yellow','b'=>'blue']}
Arrays can be nested.
{assign var=foo value=[1,[9,8],3]}

There is a new short syntax supported for assigning variables.
Example: {$foo=$bar+2}

You can assign a value to a specific array element. If the variable exists but
is not an array, it is converted to an array before the new values are assigned.
Examples:
{$foo['bar']=1}
{$foo['bar']['blar']=1}

You can append values to an array. If the variable exists but is not an array,
it is converted to an array before the new values are assigned.
Example: {$foo[]=1}

You can use a PHP-like syntax for accessing array elements, as well as the
original "dot" notation.
Examples:
{$foo[1]}             normal access
{$foo['bar']}
{$foo['bar'][1]}
{$foo[$x+$x]}         index may contain any expression
{$foo[$bar[1]]}       nested index
{$foo[section_name]}  smarty section access, not array access!

The original "dot" notation stays, and with improvements.
Examples:
{$foo.a.b.c}        =>  $foo['a']['b']['c'] 
{$foo.a.$b.c}       =>  $foo['a'][$b]['c']        with variable index
{$foo.a.{$b+4}.c}   =>  $foo['a'][$b+4]['c']       with expression as index
{$foo.a.{$b.c}}     =>  $foo['a'][$b['c']]         with nested index

note that { and } are used to address ambiguties when nesting the dot syntax. 

Variable names themselves can be variable and contain expressions.
Examples:
$foo         normal variable
$foo_{$bar}  variable name containing other variable 
$foo_{$x+$y} variable name containing expressions 
$foo_{$bar}_buh_{$blar}  variable name with multiple segments
{$foo_{$x}}  will output the variable $foo_1 if $x has a value of 1.

Object method chaining is implemented.
Example: {$object->method1($x)->method2($y)}

{for} tag added for looping (replacement for {section} tag):
{for $x=0, $y=count($foo); $x<$y; $x++}  ....  {/for}
Any number of statements can be used separated by comma as the first
inital expression at {for}.

{for $x = $start to $end step $step} ... {/for}is in the SVN now .
You can use also
{for $x = $start to $end} ... {/for}
In this case the step value will be automaticall 1 or -1 depending on the start and end values.
Instead of $start and $end you can use any valid expression.
Inside the loop the following special vars can be accessed:
$x@iteration = number of iteration
$x@total = total number of iterations
$x@first = true on first iteration
$x@last = true on last iteration


The Smarty 2 {section} syntax is still supported.

New shorter {foreach} syntax to loop over an array.
Example: {foreach $myarray as $var}...{/foreach}

Within the foreach loop, properties are access via:

$var@key            foreach $var array key
$var@iteration      foreach current iteration count (1,2,3...)
$var@index          foreach current index count (0,1,2...)
$var@total          foreach $var array total
$var@first          true on first iteration
$var@last           true on last iteration

The Smarty 2 {foreach} tag syntax is still supported.

NOTE: {$bar[foo]} still indicates a variable inside of a {section} named foo. 
If you want to access an array element with index foo, you must use quotes
such as {$bar['foo']}, or use the dot syntax {$bar.foo}.

while block tag is now implemented:
{while $foo}...{/while}
{while $x lt 10}...{/while}

Direct access to PHP functions:
Just as you can use PHP functions as modifiers directly, you can now access
PHP functions directly, provided they are permitted by security settings:
{time()}

There is a new {function}...{/function} block tag to implement a template function.
This enables reuse of code sequences like a plugin function. It can call itself recursively.
Template function must be called with the new {call name=foo...} tag.

Example:

Template file:
{function name=menu level=0}
  <ul class="level{$level}">
  {foreach $data as $entry}
    {if is_array($entry)}
      <li>{$entry@key}</li>
       {call name=menu data=$entry level=$level+1}
    {else}
      <li>{$entry}</li>
    {/if}
  {/foreach}
  </ul>
{/function}

{$menu = ['item1','item2','item3' => ['item3-1','item3-2','item3-3' =>
  ['item3-3-1','item3-3-2']],'item4']}

{call name=menu data=$menu}


Generated output:
    * item1
    * item2
    * item3
          o item3-1
          o item3-2
          o item3-3
                + item3-3-1
                + item3-3-2
    * item4

The function tag itself must have the "name" attribute. This name is the tag
name when calling the function. The function tag may have any number of
additional attributes. These will be default settings for local variables.

New {nocache} block function:
{nocache}...{/nocache} will declare a section of the template to be non-cached
when template caching is enabled.

New nocache attribute:
You can declare variable/function output as non-cached with the nocache attribute.
Examples:

{$foo nocache=true}
{$foo nocache} /* same */

{foo bar="baz" nocache=true}
{foo bar="baz" nocache} /* same */

{time() nocache=true}
{time() nocache} /* same */

Or you can also assign the variable in your script as nocache:
$smarty->assign('foo',$something,true); // third param is nocache setting
{$foo} /* non-cached */

$smarty.current_dir returns the directory name of the current template.

You can use strings directly as templates with the "string" resource type.
Examples:
$smarty->display('string:This is my template, {$foo}!'); // php
{include file="string:This is my template, {$foo}!"} // template



VARIABLE SCOPE / VARIABLE STORAGE
=================================

In Smarty 2, all assigned variables were stored within the Smarty object. 
Therefore, all variables assigned in PHP were accessible by all subsequent 
fetch and display template calls.

In Smarty 3, we have the choice to assign variables to the main Smarty object, 
to user-created data objects, and to user-created template objects. 
These objects can be chained. The object at the end of a chain can access all
variables belonging to that template and all variables within the parent objects.
The Smarty object can only be the root of a chain, but a chain can be isolated
from the Smarty object.

All known Smarty assignment interfaces will work on the data and template objects.

Besides the above mentioned objects, there is also a special storage area for
global variables.

A Smarty data object can be created as follows:
$data = $smarty->createData();    // create root data object
$data->assign('foo','bar');       // assign variables as usual
$data->config_load('my.conf');									 // load config file    

$data= $smarty->createData($smarty);  // create data object having a parent link to
the Smarty object

$data2= $smarty->createData($data);   // create data object having a parent link to
the $data data object

A template object can be created by using the createTemplate method. It has the
same parameter assignments as the fetch() or display() method.
Function definition:
function createTemplate($template, $cache_id = null, $compile_id = null, $parent = null)

The first parameter can be a template name, a smarty object or a data object.

Examples:
$tpl = $smarty->createTemplate('mytpl.tpl'); // create template object not linked to any parent
$tpl->assign('foo','bar');                   // directly assign variables
$tpl->config_load('my.conf');									 // load config file    

$tpl = $smarty->createTemplate('mytpl.tpl',$smarty);  // create template having a parent link to the Smarty object
$tpl = $smarty->createTemplate('mytpl.tpl',$data);    // create template having a parent link to the $data object

The standard fetch() and display() methods will implicitly create a template object.
If the $parent parameter is not specified in these method calls, the template object
is will link back to the Smarty object as it's parent.

If a template is called by an {include...} tag from another template, the
subtemplate links back to the calling template as it's parent. 

All variables assigned locally or from a parent template are accessible. If the
template creates or modifies a variable by using the {assign var=foo...} or
{$foo=...} tags, these new values are only known locally (local scope). When the
template exits, none of the new variables or modifications can be seen in the
parent template(s). This is same behavior as in Smarty 2. 

With Smarty 3, we can assign variables with a scope attribute which allows the
availablility of these new variables or modifications globally (ie in the parent
templates.)

Possible scopes are local, parent, root and global. 
Examples:
{assign var=foo value='bar'}       // no scope is specified, the default 'local'
{$foo='bar'}                       // same, local scope
{assign var=foo value='bar' scope='local'} // same, local scope

{assign var=foo value='bar' scope='parent'} // Values will be available to the parent object 
{$foo='bar' scope='parent'}                 // (normally the calling template)

{assign var=foo value='bar' scope='root'}   // Values will be exported up to the root object, so they can 
{$foo='bar' scope='root'}                   // be seen from all templates using the same root.

{assign var=foo value='bar' scope='global'} // Values will be exported to global variable storage, 
{$foo='bar' scope='global'}                 // they are available to any and all templates.


The scope attribute can also be attached to the {include...} tag. In this case,
the specified scope will be the default scope for all assignments within the
included template.


PLUGINS
=======

463 464 465
Smarty 3 plugins follow the same coding rules as in Smarty 2. 
The main difference is that the template object is now passed in place of the smarty object. 
The smarty object can be still be accessed through $template->smarty.
466

467
smarty_plugintype_name (array $params, Smarty_Internal_Template $template)
468

469
The Smarty 2 plugins are still compatible as long as they do not make use of specific Smarty 2 internals.
470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541 542 543 544 545 546 547 548 549 550 551 552 553 554 555 556 557 558 559 560 561 562 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 571 572 573 574 575


TEMPLATE INHERITANCE:
=====================

With template inheritance you can define blocks, which are areas that can be
overriden by child templates, so your templates could look like this: 

parent.tpl:
<html>
  <head>
    <title>{block name='title'}My site name{/block}</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <h1>{block name='page-title'}Default page title{/block}</h1>
    <div id="content">
      {block name='content'}
        Default content
      {/block}
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

child.tpl:
{extends file='parent.tpl'} 
{block name='title'}
Child title
{/block}

grandchild.tpl:
{extends file='child.tpl'} 
{block name='title'}Home - {$smarty.block.parent}{/block} 
{block name='page-title'}My home{/block}
{block name='content'}
  {foreach $images as $img}
    <img src="{$img.url}" alt="{$img.description}" />
  {/foreach}
{/block}

We redefined all the blocks here, however in the title block we used {$smarty.block.parent},
which tells Smarty to insert the default content from the parent template in its place.
The content block was overriden to display the image files, and page-title has also be 
overriden to display a completely different title. 

If we render grandchild.tpl we will get this: 
<html>
  <head>
    <title>Home - Child title</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <h1>My home</h1>
    <div id="content">
      <img src="/example.jpg" alt="image" />
      <img src="/example2.jpg" alt="image" />
      <img src="/example3.jpg" alt="image" />
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

NOTE: In the child templates everything outside the {extends} or {block} tag sections
is ignored.

The inheritance tree can be as big as you want (meaning you can extend a file that 
extends another one that extends another one and so on..), but be aware that all files 
have to be checked for modifications at runtime so the more inheritance the more overhead you add.

Instead of defining the parent/child relationships with the {extends} tag in the child template you
can use the resource as follow:

$smarty->display('extends:parent.tpl|child.tpl|grandchild.tpl');

Child {block} tags may optionally have a append or prepend attribute. In this case the parent block content 
is appended or prepended to the child block content.

{block name='title' append} My title {/block}


PHP STREAMS:
============

(see online documentation)

VARIBLE FILTERS:
================

(see online documentation)


STATIC CLASS ACCESS AND NAMESPACE SUPPORT
=========================================

You can register a class with optional namespace for the use in the template like:

$smarty->register->templateClass('foo','name\name2\myclass');

In the template you can use it like this:
{foo::method()}  etc.


=======================

Please look through it and send any questions/suggestions/etc to the forums.

http://www.phpinsider.com/smarty-forum/viewtopic.php?t=14168

Monte and Uwe